Category Archives: Misc

Kojaque – Town’s Dead

“I just had my head kicked in.”

So begins the new single and title track from the new album by Dublin rapper Kevin Smith (top) aka Kojaque.

The 26-year-old MC has also made a film to accompany the record: Town’s Dead – The Movie.

If the innovative vid here is anything to go by, strap yourselves in, it’s gonna be a helluva ride.

Nick says: A head of the game.

Kojaque

Oh.

This morning.

That’ll learn them.

RollingNews

Thanks Bebe

Meanwhile…

Yesterday.

It’s a win win.

Meanwhile…

While Krispy Kreme is offering free doughnuts to people who are vaccinated against Covid-19, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine is betting dollars to those donuts.

The state will give away millions of dollars to vaccinated people and full scholarships to vaccinated children through special lotteries.

It’s just the latest and perhaps most extreme of efforts being made by governments, employers, sports teams and others to motivate more people to get vaccinated.

Others have tried free doughnuts, beers and gifts cards. Now, Ohio is betting millions to improve its vaccination rate (CNN)

Yesterday: Stuck On You

Pic: CNN

Martin Garrix feat. Bono & The Edge – We Are The People

‘We Are The People Of The Open Hand/Streets Of Dublin To Notre Dame,

‘We’ll Build It Better Than We Did Before /We Are The People We’ve Been Waiting For’

Hmm.

The official UEFA EURO 2020 song.

Back of the net?

or globalist howler?

Only you can decide

Martin Garrix?

Seth Rogan

On The Late Late Show

…Maureen Catterson writes:

Ryan Tubridy will chat to Hollywood actor and producer Seth Rogen, star of Superbad, Bad Neighbours and The Lion King…

Sinead and Mark Gallagher-Hedderman made news headlines last month when they had to take their case to court to avoid mandatory hotel quarantine with their 8-day-old baby boy. They share their surrogacy story and introduce their baby Theo

We’ll be showcasing some of this year’s 24,000 entries from across Ireland in The Student Enterprise Awards

…To celebrate the 30th anniversary of The Commitments Ryan will be joined by a supergroup to perform the greatest songs from the soundtrack to the iconic 1991 film. West End star Killian Donnelly and Eurovision winner, Niamh Kavanagh will be singing….

…Relatives of some of the 10 innocent victims killed during the Ballymurphy Massacre speak to Ryan about their 50-year quest for justice and what they believe UK Prime Minister, Boris Johnson needs to do next.


The Late Late Show
tomorrow on RTÉ One at 9.35pm.

Pic: Rex

A Little History of Sandymount Beach.

Harry writes:

Walking along the beach at Sandymount today and glancing across at the houses along Strand Road it’s hard to believe that in the 18th century there were very few buildings in what was then Brickfield Town (Brickfield Town was later named Sandymount around 1810). The name Brickfield was derived from a major brickworks in the area.

The brickworks manufactured bricks for the new Georgian houses that were being constructed in the likes of Fitzwilliam Square, Fitzwilliam Street and the Pembroke Estate. At that time only ten families lived around a triangle of workers cottages in what later became Sandymount Green. It wasn’t until the arrival of the 19th century and the building of the sea wall that the area became popular for wealthy merchant Dubliners to build fine houses along the coast line and in Sandymount.

Strand road along the beachfront is a good one-kilometre stroll and worth the walk. Looking out to sea at the view of the coast, it is understandable why James Joyce and his beloved Nora Barnacle from Galway loved the area so much with its beautiful views of Dublin Bay. Joyce wrote of the beach being “at the lace fringe of the tide”.

The view towards Dun Laoire on a sunny day is splendid. Looking back towards Pigeon House and Poolbeg along with the iconic twin chimneys with Howth in the distance is a fine view, it’s the sight of the albeit, very environmentally clean Poolbeg incinerator that ruins it for me, but still its architecture has a very brutalist style that I am sure some folks would enjoy.

Halfway along the road is a notable Martello Tower with 2.75-metre-thick walls that was completed in 1804. It is one of the larger ones along the coastline. Twenty soldiers manned the tower for guarding the coast. The tower had a one-storey building attached with a stores for weaponry along with two 24 pound roof cannons to engage with any enemy ships across Dublin Bay.

The present incarnation of the tower has been modified with an additional window and metal shutters designed for a restaurant but unfortunately it never came to fruition and is closed to the public. There was a total of fifty Martello towers built along the coast of Ireland in the early 1800s as a defensive measure by our British chums in case that the French Emperor Napoleon would invade Ireland during the Napoleonic war between England and France.

A contemporary account of military exercises at Sandymount in 1806 records how the towers functioned as a complement to other military forces:

“INTERESTING MILITARY SPECTACLE, At an early hour on Friday morning the troop of horse artillery, and two car brigades of light artillery marched on the sands between the Pigeon-house fort and Sandymount … a shell was thrown from the Pigeon-house fort as a signal for the commencement of the novel and interesting scene that was to follow: the horse artillery immediately advanced from behind Sandymount, as did the light artillery from Ringsend and Irishtown (where they had been concealed), upon the sands, where targets were placed for their practice; during their advance, the Pigeon-house fort and the Martello towers on that line of coast kept up a steady fire of shot and shell”.

I would imagine that day was not a good day for a quiet walk on the beach!

Halfway along the beach and out to sea there are the ruins and walls of what once was Merrion Pier and Sandymount swimming baths. The Merrion Promenade Pier and Baths Company Ltd built Sandymount swimming baths, opening them in 1883 to take advantage of Dubliner’s leisure time during the summer.

The baths were very popular in their day and they measured approximately 40 by 40 metres with separate pools for ladies and gentlemen. A 73-metre pier built of iron girders and timber planks for flooring was added in 1884. With the convenience of Merrion and Sandymount then having both tram and rail, the pier and baths were a popular destination for Dubliners.

At the height of their popularity in 1890 over 30,0000 bathers visited during that summer season, swimming in the fresh seawater baths, partaking of refreshments along the pier accompanied by the enjoyment of music concerts on the bandstand.

When the tide was out the gaps between the planks along the pier attracted “Peeping Toms” and from time-to-time bath attendants would attempt to cool their ardour by dumping buckets of cold sea water on them.

Sadly, the pier and baths fell out of favour and slowly turned to dereliction. By 1923 the seaward wall had collapsed resulting in the baths being dismantled and the iron from the pier being sold as scrap to the Hammond Lane Foundry. At low tide you can still walk out to the baths to day and visit their ruins.

So, the next time you are walking along Sandymount strand have a gaze at the unused Martello tower that with a bit of imagination could be turned into a civic building, perhaps a museum and wonder at the ruins of the old baths, then ponder awhile as to why Dublin City council in all these years hasn’t bothered to either develop the Martello tower or demolish and remove the ruins of the baths as they are a dangerous eyesore, or even to refurbish them into something more modern. Perhaps Broadsheet readers know?

Harry’s Dublin appears here every Friday.

All pics by Harry Warren

Van Morrison and Eric Clapton

Yesterday.

Following his latest collaboration with Van Morrison on anti-lockdown song Where Have All ther Rebels Gone….

…Eric Clapton, in a message to covid response critic Robin Monotti Graziadei, writes:

‘I am an old timer, I have survived, with great help, addiction and alcoholism, and stand now in the greatest dilemma of my life…

I have inwardly stood against our ‘elected leaders’ since Brexit, intuitively doubting their integrity and character…

With the arrival of C-19 I hoped that C Henegan, S Gupta and Jay B would lead the way, but when Imperial College stepped up with their jailer’s key, I knew we were in deep trouble…

I am a man of faith, albeit abstract, and what I felt and saw unfold in March ‘20 began to lead me away from govt rhetoric and the devotion of the general public to the PM and his cronies…

I looked for heroes in the house [UK Parliament], and found C Walker, Desmond Swayne, and in unfortunate retirement, Lord Sumption

On YouTube I found Hugotalks and Talk Radio… that was all….

Then I was directed to Van M, that’s when I found my voice, and even though I was singing his words, they echoed in my heart…

I recorded “Stand and Deliver” in 2020, and was immediately regaled with contempt and scorn…

In February this year, before I learned about the nature of the vaccines, (and being 76 with emphysema) I was in the avant garde. I took the first jab of AZ and straight away had severe reactions which lasted ten days, I recovered eventually and was told it would be twelve weeks before the second one…

About six weeks later I was offered and took the second AZ shot, but with a little more knowledge of the dangers. Needless to say the reactions were disastrous, my hands and feet were either frozen, numb or burning, and pretty much useless for two weeks, I feared I would never play again, (I suffer with peripheral neuropathy and should never have gone near the needle.) But the propaganda said the vaccine was safe for everyone….

Then I met a member of this group [Covid response critics], who counselled me to be careful and to have a look at what goes on with you guys…

I felt like a veil had been lifted, that I was no longer alone, that it was okay, in fact essential, to hold on to my intuition and follow my heart

I continue to tread the path of passive rebellion and try to tow the line in order to be able to actively love my family, but it’s hard to bite my tongue with what I now know…

I’ve recorded another song by Van called “The Rebels” it’s not aggressive or provocative, it just asks;

“Where have all the rebels gone?

Hiding behind their computer screens

Where’s the spirit, where is the soul

Where have all the rebels gone”

I’ve been a rebel all my life, against tyranny and arrogant authority, which is what we have now, but I also crave fellowship, compassion and love, and that I find here…

I believe with these things we can prevail.’

Play ‘Layla’.

Previously: You May Like This

The votes are in.

Last week, with a €20 Currys PC World voucher redeemable in any Currys store on offer, I asked you to name your favorite song from the past that sounds like it could be from the future.

You answered in your dozens.

But there could be only one winner.

Third Place:

O Superman by Laurie Anderson.

Andy Pipkin writes:

“Was from the future years ago (1982) and still is now, Laurie Anderson’s brilliant O Superman. Enjoy.”

Runner-up:

The first Doctor Who theme.

Scottser writes:

“It has to be the Doctor Who theme tune, made by Delia Derbyshire.”

Winner:

Sexy Boy by Air

Nicorigo writes:

“Nothing says future more than the synths, drum machines and other modulations of the spacey French electronica duet’s first ever single.”

Nick says: Thanks all.

Last week: Win Nick’s Voucher

Currys PC World

Sculptor Aidan Harte and his Púca of Ennistymon, county Clare

‘sup?

This morning.

Further to Clare County Council’s decision to ‘pause’ plans to install a €30,000 statue of a mythical half-man, half horse…

…Via The Times:

The Púca of Ennistymon sculpture should be put up in the capital if the people of Clare oppose the artwork due to superstitions, Dublin city councillors have said.

The artist behind the work told The Times that he would prefer it to be erected in the Clare town, but would be open to it being moved elsewhere if locals rejected it.

Dublin ready to host ‘grotesque’ Púca statue after Clare locals fear bad luck (The Times)

Puca Paused But Division Remains In Ennistymon (Clare Champion)

Pic: Aidan Harte