Tag Archives: Abortion

Our Lady Of Lourdes Hospital in Drogheda, Co Louth

The Liberal is reporting a protest is set to take place outside Our Lady Of Lourdes hospital today “in efforts to stop two abortions that are believed to be taking place”.

Meanwhile…

This morning in The Times Ireland edition.

Ellen Coyne reports:

Anti-abortion activists who tried to coax a woman into a fake scan appointment also tried to report a separate termination to gardaí last week, The Times can reveal.

Activists working for the Good Counsel Network, which runs a rogue crisis pregnancy agency in Dublin, turned up at Drogheda garda station claiming to have knowledge about an abortion performed at Our Lady of Lourdes hospital. They called for the doctors involved to be investigated and possibly prosecuted.

…Eamonn Murphy, an anti-abortion activist who works for the Woman’s Centre and the Good Counsel Network, was at Drogheda garda station last week trying to report a crime after “an innocent person was killed”.

He tried to tell a garda that the doctor involved should face a 14-year prison sentence for being involved in an “unlawful killing”.

Anti-abortion activists ‘getting details’ of cases (The Times Ireland)

Yesterday: ‘The Guy Started Screaming Down The Phone At Her’

9, Berkeley Street, Inns Quay, Dublin 7

In September 2016.

Ellen Coyne and Catherine Sanz, of The Times Ireland edition, went undercover at an ‘abortion advice’ centre on Berkeley Street, Inns Quay, Dublin 7.

The journalists secretly recorded a counsellor at the clinic advising that abortions cause breast cancer and can turn women into child abusers.

Further to this…

Previously: Behind The Blue Door

 The Coombe Woman and Infants University Hospital in Dublin

This morning.

Further to claims in the Dáil that a woman was refused a termination in the case of a fatal foetal abnormality at the Coombe Hospital in Dublin…

“The board have said that they have no role in the ruling of the case – I do think we need to have the full facts.

But I do also know that we must acknowledge it is a new service, there are new challenges of course around a service such as this.

But the service is significantly better than what was there on the 31st of December, when women had to leave the country, leave the jurisdiction to travel abroad for a termination of pregnancy – or they had to purchase medication illegally online.

Nineteen maternity hospital have signed up to provide this service, so obviously there are challenges at the beginning of this service – but as I said I’m not going to rush to any judgement.”

Junior minister Mary Mitchell O’Connor on Newstalk this morning

Update: Minister calls for ‘full facts’ to be known after woman is denied abortion at Dublin hospital (Irish Examiner)

Last night: “Her Words To Me Were: ‘This Is Not What I Voted For’”

Rollingnews

Ah.

Meanwhile

Close to one thousand people marched through Drogheda [yesterday] to protest at proposals to change the name of Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital.

The hospital, which is one of the busiest acute hospitals in the country, was bought by the HSE from the Medical Missionaries of Mary in 1997.

It is understood that staff were asked which of three other names it should be called: Drogheda University Hospital, Drogheda Regional Hospital or Drogheda General Hospital.

Hundreds march to protest name change of Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital (Independent.ie)

Tonight.

Following a vote in the Seanad, The Regulation of Termination of Pregnancy Bil will now go to President Higgins to sign into law having passed all stages of the Oireachtas.

Deirdre Duffy, Campaign Manager for Together for Yes, said:

“This is a truly momentous day for women in Ireland. Today, the final hurdle for Together for Yes has been crossed.

For the first time ever since the establishment of the state, women who become pregnant in Ireland are now safe and protected by compassionate legislation.

The harm and suffering the Eighth has caused for women is now only a memory and as a nation we will ensure that women are never treated this way again in Ireland.

2018 will be recognised as a turning point in how this country respects and treats women.

This year has unleashed a new women’s movement across the generations who are now determined to overcome all remaining challenges to achieve real and lasting gender equality.”

Abortion legislation passes all stages of Oireachtas (RTÉ)

Last night.

Kildare Street, Dublin 2

Pro choice protestors calling for free, safe, legal abortion in Ireland, while inside Leinster House…

Simon Harris said he was “delighted” to have changed his mind on abortion over the past seven years in response to accusations that he was untrustworthy on the issue.

The health minister had promised to oppose any change to Ireland’s abortion law in 2011 before his U-turn.

He was speaking as a landmark bill to legalise access to abortion last night failed to clear its last stages in the Dáil. It means that the report stage of the bill will finish in the lower house next week, at the earliest. The government is under pressure to meet a promise it made after May’s referendum to have legal abortion services in place in Ireland by January .

The bill still needs to complete its report and final stage in the Dáil and also make its way through the Seanad before the parliament breaks for Christmas.

Simon Harris defends U-turn on abortion (The Times Ireland Edition)

Rollingnews

From top: Minister for Health Simon Harris flanked by Master of Holles Street Rhona Mahoney (left) and Master of the Rotunda Fergal Malone during the Eight Amendment referendum campaign last May; Terry McMahon

Have to ask this question. Not trying to offend anyone, though precedent suggests this will likely inspire that strange rage that seems to be our national language these days. Or that other reaction. Silence. Followed by censorship. But, in good conscience, it has to be asked.

Abortion, for a woman, or a couple, is a profoundly private decision. In advance of the ‘Repeal’ referendum, many people were asked to put their personal morality aside and use democracy to give those women or couples the right to make that profound decision in their own country, rather than be shamed into travelling overseas to terminate.

Repeal proved to be a divisive campaign. As both sides carved out their positions decades of inarticulate rage also spewed out. New names were given to old words and language lost all meaning. Anything that didn’t fit into the new narrative was cut out like a gangrene memory.

Yet, when it came to the ballot box, people believed their final decision was done for noble reasons. Both sides believed they were doing the right thing.

And the democratic outcome decided that the right to life of the unborn was no longer constitutionally equal to the right to life of the mother.

At least it was now clear. Easy to comprehend. Regardless of which way you voted. Regardless of the moral complexities.

But now we have politicians defining the consequence of that outcome. We are trusting them with the most profound issue of our time, even if many of them have a verifiable history of implementing policies that have destroyed people’s lives.

We are allowing them to define the reality of abortion, even if many of these men and women have already proven themselves to be psychopaths.

These trusted politicians are now questioning if our nation’s remarkable hospital staff, many of whom are legitimate conscientious objectors, should be forced to participate in abortions. Or face being struck off.

These trusted politicians are now questioning if race, gender, and physical or mental disability are valid reasons for late-term abortion. Including the termination of someone with Downs Syndrome.

These trusted politicians are now questioning if we should refuse to administer pain relief to the soon-to-be-terminated foetus on the grounds that it is just another attempt to shame the mother. Yes, you read that correctly.

Have we really gone from legitimately attempting to address the stigma of shaming a woman seeking an abortion by repealing the 8th, to insisting that a late-term foetus, who feels everything with every nerve ending in its body, should be granted no pain relief in case we cause that mother some shame?

No matter which side you were on, is there anyone out there – literally anyone – who supports the assertion that granting pain relief to an unborn child in advance of its painful death is somehow wrong?

Amid all the noise of Repeal, is this really what we voted ‘Yes’ for? If it’s not, then why in hell are we all so suddenly silent?

Terry McMahon is a filmmaker and can be found on Twitter @terrymcmahon69

Previously: Terry McMahon on Broadsheet

Rollingnews

 

Nine TDs want to amend the bill to make it a criminal offence for a woman not to have a burial or a cremation after an abortion, including in cases where they had taken abortion pills prescribed by a GP at home.

The TDs who backed the proposal are: Mattie McGrath, Michael Lowry, Michael Healy-Rae, Danny Healy-Rae, Michael Collins, Michael Fitzmaurice, Peter Fitzpatrick, Noel Grealish and Carol Nolan.

TDs want women to have aborted foetuses buried (TEllen Coyne, The Times Ireland Edition)

Rollingnews

A mural of the late Savita Halappanavar by artist Aches on Richmond Street South, Dublin, at the time of the Eighth Amendment

RTE reports:

Today’s Supreme Court decision refusing to hear a further appeal on challenging the outcome of the referendum on the Eighth Amendment means the legislation can now be signed into law, according to the Taoiseach.

Legislation to allow for abortion in certain circumstances is on track to be passed by the Oireachtas before Christmas, Leo Varadkar told the media on the final day of his party’s think-in in Galway.

He said the Government intends to have services in place “for Irish women who need them” in January.

Supreme Court refuses further Eighth Amendment appeal (RTE)

Sam Boal/Rollingnews