Tag Archives: CSO figures

Census 2016 figures and Taoiseach Leo Varadkar and Housing Minister Eoghan Murphy

You may recall the Census 2016 figures which showed 183, 312 vacant houses in Ireland – excluding vacant holiday homes.

And yesterday’s figures showing 8,160 people were registered as homeless in the last week of July.

Further to this…

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar spoke to journalists following the emergency housing summit in Custom House this morning.

While speaking to them, Mr Varadkar raised the subject of vacant houses.

He said:

On the vacant house tax, that is something that’s under consideration but, again, a very interesting discussion with the Chief Executives today if you take for example Fingal or Galway where they’ve actually gone out to the individual houses to see how many are vacant while the CSO may say there’s a certain number and geocodes say there’s another number, when the council staff have actually gone out to the houses and apartments and knocked on doors, they’ve found that the numbers that are really vacant are actually much smaller than any of the figures show.”

Pic: Michael Lehane

Earlier: When Anthony Met The Housing Minister

CSO-FDI_-_final

CSO-HISTORICAL_EARNINGS_-_final_revisedScreen Shot 2017-05-03 at 11.29.29

This morning.

The Central Statistics Office released new figures on foreign direct investment in 2015, historical earnings from 1938 to 2015, and unemployment in Ireland.

The unemployment figures show the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for April 2017 was 6.2%, down from 8.4% in April 2016.

Read about the foreign direct investment figures here, historical earnings here, and unemployment figures here

Via CSO

 

Screen-Shot-2016-05-05-at-13.25.36

Taoiseach Enda Kenny

Further to yesterday’s eye-popping CSO figures

Taoiseach and Fine Gael leader Enda Kenny fielded questions from Fianna Fáil leader Micheal Martin about the reported 26.3% growth in the economy.

From the debate…

Taoiseach Enda Kenny: “First, the figures produced yesterday are unprecedented. They do not reflect accurately what is happening in the economy. Obviously, the figure of 26% is unprecedented and significantly stronger than the previous estimate of 7.8%, but it is important to note that is due to exceptional factors. It highlights the complexity and difficulty in interpreting the macroeconomic data in Ireland. The figures reflect a number of factors, including the impact of relocation of entire plcs to Ireland. This would have significantly boosted investment and net exports. Net exports contributed 18% to the 2015 growth figure. Contract manufacturing played a role in the figures. This occurs where an Irish-based company with another manufacturing unit abroad manufactures and sells products to other countries from that unit but is still based in Ireland.”

“While the headline figures can be exaggerated in an Irish context and will obviously be the subject of intense scrutiny, other indicators such as the level of consumer spending, the rise in the level of employment and the continuous drop in unemployment trends, as well as taxation receipts, confirm that there is a strong recovery rooted in the domestic economy in Ireland.”

“That domestic demand – spending by Irish businesses and Irish people – is also growing strongly. It is an opportunity arising from the many sacrifices made during the years.”

“The figures predate the decision in Britain in the referendum. Obviously, there has been a sharp depreciation of sterling since that decision and a deterioration in the outlook for the UK economy. While it is an unprecedented figure, the fact is, based on growth projections in real terms, the growth levels seen in 2015 were both a one-off and exceptional in nature. We cannot make policy on that basis, but the CSO takes into account in compiling its figures issues such as aircraft leasing and manufacturing here by companies that have units abroad.”

“As noted in the summer economic statement which was debated in the Dáil some time ago, the Department of Finance will prepare a full macroeconomic projection in advance of the budget in October. It will include updated estimates of economic growth, the public finances and whatever fiscal space is available to the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform, Deputy Paschal Donohoe, taking account of developments up to that time, including the latest CSO numbers and the decision in the United Kingdom.”

Ceann Comhairle Seán Ó Fearghaíl: “The Taoiseach’s time is up.”

Micheál Martin: The Taoiseach did not answer the question, which was whether he would commission the CSO to design a proper, accurate way of calculating the real size of the economy.”

“Professor John FitzGerald, formally of the ESRI, has attempted to do this as an individual. It is shocking that the Department of Finance and the Taoiseach’s Department did not work years ago to create a proper model to calculate the size of the economy.”

The figures are not unprecedented. They are false in terms of what is happening on the ground and the reality in the economy. The CSO says it is including – not taking account of – the impact of aircraft leasing, corporate inversions and contract manufacturing, but none of this impacts on real jobs and investment in the economy, as the thousands of people who are struggling realise. It is not good enough that no one in official Ireland has attempted to address this by coming up with an accurate home-grown model that takes all of this into account, strips it out and gives us a proper figure.”

Ó Fearghaíl: “Thank you, Deputy Martin.”

Martin: “It is essential that this be done, in terms of how we plan our budgets and economy but also in terms of our international reputation. Unfortunately, the international world looks at this with some degree of ridicule and disbelief. There was a time when we would haughtily go around the place questioning the Chinese or the Russians for their economic statistics. Can we really go abroad and hold our heads up high…”

Ó Fearghaíl: “You have made your point, thank you.”

Martin: “…about Irish official statistics? No one in their right mind believes Irish official statistics. This cuts to the heart of our credibility in terms of presenting economic data. This is a serious issue which needs urgent addressing by the Taoiseach’s Department, the CSO and other related State entities.”

Kenny: “It is true to say the CSO is quite independent in how it does its analysis, but it does take these factors into account. Changes have occurred, such as the transition of entire public limited companies to Ireland and the transfer of a significant amount of intellectual property, contract manufacturing and the scale of aircraft leasing.”

The Deputy is right in terms of these figures boosting GDP. There is no proportionate increase in employment. These are figures which are compiled accurately by the CSO and they take into account those changes that have taken place in the international economy.”

“The Deputy is aware of the changes made by the Government in terms of complying with base erosion and profit shifting, BEPS, and the OECD in terms of having got rid of the double Irish concept. The issues of aircraft leasing, contract manufacturing, intellectual property moving onshore here and the transition of entire public limited companies has boosted these figures.”

Ó Fearghaíl: “Thank you, Taoiseach.”

Kenny:The Department of Finance will set out its projections later in the year, but it will also base its policy on a more normal growth rate, such as has been predicted by the Department, of in the region of 3.5% to 4%. I agree that an extraordinary elevation of 26% based on some of these factors and others, such as the depreciation of sterling, do not impact in reality on big numbers in terms of employment…”

Ó Fearghaíl: “Thank you, Taoiseach. The time is up.”

Kenny: “…but it is important that on the underlying issues the growth in jobs and consumer spend and the drop in unemployment is where the real value of the economy is and the projections will be based on 3.5% to 4%.”

There you go now.

Previously: Meanwhile, In Davos

Meanwhile…

CnPwFA5XYAAaqkc

Jason Kelleher, of Irish Political Maps, tweetz:

Part of something larger I’m working on, but here’s the combined Fine Gael-Fianna Fáil vote in 2016…

Transcript via Oireachtas.ie

Irish Political Maps

Screen Shot 2016-07-12 at 11.28.47

Yikes.

View CSO figures in full here

Boeing.

Ge Capital Aviation Services?

UPDATE:

During RTÉ’s News at One, RTÉ’s Business Editor David Murphy spoke to Audrey Carville about the figures.

From the interview…

Audrey Carville: “David, has it really grown by so much?

David Murphy:No. I think the issue here is Audrey, that what’s happened is that when the CSO does its figures it has to take account of what companies are doing. And, normally, if a company invests in an asset like a factory then that will result in more employment and boost the economy. So those assets are very important. But what’s happened is that a number of large, international companies have bought aircraft, they’ve done corporate restructuring and some companies have located assets to Ireland for the first time. And as a result, it’s had a one-off effect on the balance sheet of the entire country and it’s distorted the figures for the entire economy quite significantly. Showing that the economy, on the face of it, would have appeared to have expanded by 26% last year. Now, were that to have happened, in reality, people would be feeling 26% richer but they’re not.”

Listen back in full here

Jobs

jobss

Emigration (out of picture).

Meanwhile, we’re down approx €16 a week this Xmas, compared to last year…

earningsFIGHT!

From the CSO