Tag Archives: travel

Law student Roman Shortall was stopped by Gardai at Dublin Airport; Garda statement on the incident

This afternoon.

Liveline on RTÉ Radio One.

Meanwhile…

Anyone?

Earlier…

From top: Fianna Fáil Minister for Education Norma Foley (left), Fianna Fáil leader Micheál Martin and Fine Gael Minister of State for Special Education and Inclusion Josepha Madigan; Ms Foley and Mr Martin; Minister for Employment and Social Protection Heather Humpheys

This morning.

On RTÉ’s Morning Ireland.

Education Minister Norma Foley was asked about the stopping of Covid-19 Pandemic Unemployment and jobseekers’ allowance payments to recipients who travel abroad on holidays.

Ms Foley was specifically asked “where did this come from? Was that brought to Cabinet at any point?” She was also asked if the legal change was notified to Cabinet.

She replied:

“No, I’m not aware of it having been brought to Cabinet.”

Meanwhile, last night…

Virgin Media One’s Gavan Reilly reported on comments made by Taoiseach Micheál Martin about the payment cuts as a result of checks having taken place at airports, as reported in the Business Post at the weekend and the Irish Daily Star on July 2.

It followed a bizarre sequence of events including a change to the Gov.ie website where the criteria for claiming the Covid-19 Pandemic Unemployment Payment was adjusted to include that people had to be “genuinely seeking work” to receive the PUP.

As a payment for people whose work has been suspended due to Covid-19 this stipulation of having to seek work appears to have been added to the list very recently.

(As recently as July 14, the Minister for Employment and Social Protection Heather Humphreys didn’t list this “genuinely seeking work” rule in a written answer about the PUP to Fianna Fáil TD Seán Fleming. In the same answer, she listed all the other criteria.)

In addition, the Irish version of the Gov.ie site doesn’t include this added condition of recipients having to be seeking work.

Curiously, on Sunday, the Tánaiste Leo Varadkar had told RTE that people receiving PUP had to be “genuinely seeking work”.

He also said the Department of Employment and Social Protection “gets information from the airports”, a claim denied by the Dublin Airport Authority and one which the Data Protection Commissioner Helen Dixon is now examining.

Mr Martin said he was seeking a report on the apparent change of policy regarding PUP recipients, while members of the Dublin Airport Authority are appearing before the Special Committee on Covid-19 Response this morning.

Meanwhile, yesterday afternoon.

On RTÉ’s News at One.

Minister for Employment and Social Protection Heather Humphreys spoke to Christopher McKevitt about the same matter. During the interview, Ms Humphreys was repeatedly asked if there had been a change in Government advice pertaining to PUP recipients. She continually didn’t answer the question.

Then, at the end of the interview, she said people who work in pubs whose work has been suspended due to Covid-19 don’t have to look for other work in order to receive the PUP.

From the interview…

Christopher McKevitt: “Just in relation to one item from, that emerged from the weekend, the halting of payments for some 104 people arising from their travel plans a Dublin Airport. Can you, as the minister, explain what’s happened there?”

Heather Humphreys: “Yeah well, we are at a crucial stage in relation to dealing with this virus and, as we look across the world, we see other countries re-introducing restrictions and asking people to return to lockdown and the Irish people have sacrificed so much and nobody wants to see us go back.

“In relation to travelling abroad, the public health advice is very clear. Do not travel abroad except for essential reasons and I want to be very clear. If any person intends to travel for essential purposes – for example, for health reasons, for a family bereavement, or for whatever, you know, essential reason, they have to go – you will continue to get your payment.

“And we’re asking and we’re encouraging people to holiday at home this year.”

McKevitt: “Right but…”

Humphreys: “And follow the clear, public health advice so that…and that’s so important in our battle to defeat this virus.”

McKevitt: “Indeed it is but can we just ask you on the specific point about leaving the country. OK, it’s the public health advice, not to leave the country but it is also the tradition that people are entitled to a two-week holiday how so ever they choose to spend that holiday is their own affair. Yes, there is guidance but it’s not enforceable guidance is it? So, so it seems to me that the Government has potentially penalised people on the social welfare code, for making that decision to travel, no matter how distasteful many people may find that decision of theirs to do so.”

Humphreys: “Yeah, well, the public health advice is not to travel abroad and that applies to everyone. So, for example, we have 340,000 public servants in this country and if any one of those chose to travel abroad they will not be paid for the two-week quarantine period when they return and, equally, there’s many private companies [who] have also told their staff that if they choose to go abroad, they will not be paid for the period that they have to quarantine when they come home. So we’re not trying to pick on anybody here. We are doing what is right by the country to protect our people.”

McKevitt: “Has there been a change…minister, minister, minister, sorry to cut across you but has there been a change in the Government.ie advice on receiving, or eligibility to receive the pandemic unemployment payment. Is it now the case that you must be genuinely seeking work? Because there’s quite an amount of activity on social media saying this is a new element that is being introduced to the qualifying guidelines as of this morning?

Humphreys: “Well, as the economy has reopened up again, of course we want people to get back to work and that’s why we’re investing a huge amount of money in trying to get people back to work. But just to be clear, under normal circumstances, there is a flexibility under social welfare legislation whereby a person on jobseekers can travel abroad for up to two weeks and it doesn’t impact their payment. But the point here is that we are not in normal circumstances. We’re in the middle of a global pandemic and it is in that context and in order to protect people’s lives…”

McKevitt: “Minister…minister…”

Humphreys: “…that we have temporarily suspended the flexibility that people can continue to receive their unemployment payment when abroad.”

McKevitt:Is there a change in the advice for the Pandemic Unemployment Payment? Let’s remind ourselves. It was for people who’d lost their job as a result of the pandemic or who’d been temporarily laid off because of the Covid-19 pandemic. That was, the expectation, for the 600-thousand-odd people who went on to it was that their job would be restored to them. Now, it seems that there is a new piece of guidance in terms of the eligibility to qualify for the PUP, that you must be genuinely seeking work. Is that the case?

Humphreys: “Yeah, well, you always have, for any unemployment…”

McKevitt: “No…”

Humphreys: “…benefit, you always had to be, you know, to look for work and genuinely be looking for work. But I think the point is being missed here. This is the public health advice, it’s to stay at home, and, and the point is that we should be staying in Ireland and in a couple of months’ time…”

McKevitt: “But is the message, minister, is the message now to the 300,000 or the 286,000 people who are receiving the Pandemic Unemployment Payment, that they, as of this morning, must be genuinely seeking work? Is that the case now?

Humphreys: “Well for some whose industry hasn’t opened back up again, obviously if you work in a pub, you know, you’re looking to get your job back there again. But, for others, they should be looking for work and that’s what most people on PUP want to do, they want to get a job, they don’t want to be on the payment, they want to get back to work. But I just want to be…”

McKevitt: “No, but supposing they’re working for a company that can no longer afford to employ them. Is it the case now that they shouldn’t necessarily be looking forward to returning to their old job but should be seeking new work in a different work environment?

Humphreys: “Well unfortunately, yeah, unfortunately, there are going to be people who won’t be able to go back to their old jobs…”

McKevitt: “And is that new advice as of today?

Humphreys: “Well, no, it’s not new advice. Obviously if you can’t get back to work, you need to, most people want to get back to work, they don’t want to stay on the unemployment payment and that’s why I have extended it. You know, last week, in the jobs stimulus, in relation to the payment, instead of reducing the payment to €203 in August, as originally planned, the Government has decided to take a fair approach and extend the payment until April and that is because we do not want anyone to suffer a cliff-edge reduction in their payment.

“So we’re not telling people you know, that, to stay at home, we want them to come back to work and that’s why we’re investing €200million in back-to-work initiatives and job incentive programmes.”

McKevitt: “If we were to return to phase two, arising from perhaps a second wave, and people had to return, people who had returned to work having received the PUP, were to go back onto the PUP scheme again, would the advice be to genuinely seek work with an alternative employer?

Humphreys: “Well, if, of course, if we go back on to the, you know, if we go backwards, and we hope, we don’t go backwards, that’s the whole point of following the public health advice, that’s the whole point of asking people to stay at home this year, because the safest thing you can do is stay at home. But you’re looking at a situation that may or may not occur.

“But the point is, if you’re on the public, the unemployment benefit at this point in time, if you don’t have a job to go to, then you should be actively looking for other work. And, you know, if your job is no longer there. In the case of some sectors, for example, if you work in a pub, we are hoping that you will be able to go back to your job so you don’t have to be looking for work in that situation. But if you find that you’re going to be permanently unemployed because your job isn’t there then you should be looking for work and that’s why we have invested all of this money in a job activation programme.”

McKevitt: “Many thanks, Minister for Social Protection and Employment Affairs Heather Humphreys.”

Meanwhile…

Meanwhile…

Meanwhile…

Listen back in full here

Taoiseach Micheál Martin arriving for last night’s cabinet meeting at Dublin Castle

This morning/last night.

The Government has agreed that the following countries be included as ‘Normal Precautions on the Department of Foreign Affairs Travel Advice’: Malta, Finland, Norway, Italy, Hungary, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Cyprus, Slovakia, Greece, Greenland, Gibraltar, Monaco, and San Marino.

Via Merrion Street:

Anyone arriving into Ireland from these countries will not have to restrict their movements. Passengers from any other country outside of those with a Normal Precautions advisory are asked to restrict their movements for 14 days.

The list will be reviewed on a fortnightly basis, based on advice from officials including public health experts.

There is no change to the current policy in respect of travel from Northern Ireland.

The Government will continue with plans to strengthen the existing measures for monitoring passengers who arrive into Ireland, including the introduction of an Electronic Passenger Locator Form, enhanced follow-up procedures, a call centre operated by the DAA, and a proposed testing regime for symptomatic passengers at airports and ports.

Processes to restrict flight or passenger travel in certain circumstances will also be explored.

In conjunction with these preventative measures, there will be a renewed communications campaign across all platforms to ensure maximum public awareness of the latest advice.

The Pandemic is not over and the public health advice remains the same. The safest thing to do is not to travel.’

Statement on Government Travel Advice (Merrion Street)

Government adds 15 countries to ‘green list’ for travel (RTÉ)

Rollingnews

Meanwhile…

Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly (above) has said public health officials are concerned a big increase in international travel could see ‘a second wave’ of Covid-19 in Ireland

This morning.

Via RTÉ

Speaking on RTÉ’s Morning Ireland, Mr Donnelly said the Government still plans to publish a “green” list of countries on 9 July, but no decision has been made on when it will be activated.

“July 9 is a decision that has been taken to publish a list.There may be a recommendation to Cabinet [on Monday] that that might change,” he said.

The minister said he understood that the issue is of great concern to people, who may have already booked holidays or who may be planning a trip abroad, and the National Public Health Emergency is meeting today on the issue.

Cases of Covid-19 in Ireland from international travel was at 2% for the last few months, but has risen to 17% in the last few weeks, he said.

Fears overseas travel could trigger second wave of Covid-19 – Donnelly (RTÉ)

Rollingnews

Former Taoiseach Enda Kenny (second left) and former Minister for Finance Michael Noonan (right) and  Barbados Prime Minister Mia Mottle (second right) and former Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Coca Cola Company, Neville Isdel in Barbados on June 20, 2019

Well for some.

Meanwhile…

Um.

Meanwhile…

Gulp.

Public trust and consultation critical (Barbados Today, June 20, 2019)

Right To Know

Ken Foxe

Baku, the capital city of Azerbaijan

Going abroad next year?

Have you considered Azerbaijan?

No wait, come back.

Fluffybiscuits writes:

Various groups of friends are planning their summer expeditions along the already well-trodden paths of Lanzarote, Nice or far-flung beaches in Greece .

I am hoping to give an overview of different destinations every so often on Broadsheet based on my own travels and the first to come to mind is Azerbaijan (Azer-what? I hear you say).

The pragmatic side of things – you need a visa which costs around 20 (the price of your entry to Coppers and about one pint in there for our culchie brethren).

But what could be in Azerbaijan?

The capital Baku has been ruled over by the Soviets, the Ottamans and rests on a confluence of culture of Turkish/Russian/Middle Eastern and lately European culture. Food alone is worth a visit.

The national dish is Plov, a pilau rice based dish based on fruit, rice and cooked in a rich stock somewhat savoury and somewhat sweet but never quite both in extremis.

Baku the capital has had money poured into it by the oil rich and ‘ruler’ Aliyev. Unemployment is unheard of as those who otherwise might be unemployed are gainfully employed as car parking attendants or road sweepers.

Baku lies on the Black Sea and is a major transport hub. Standing just over the promenade is the three flame towers in which the colours of the Azerbaijani flag dance interchangeably in what counts as one of the biggest white elephants in existence.

Only about the first ten floors are used and the rest is just tens of floors of glass, however pointless it is, it is spectacular.

An old town winds around part of the city littered with stray cats but also littered with little shops, bakeries, restaurants and bars.

Ignore the carpet museum (the only other place I encountered an Irish guy who was raised in Luxembourg) as most of the tapestries are like the DUP – pointless and were probably last relevant 80 to a 100 years ago if even.

What is worth seeing is the Palace of the Shirvanshahs which is spectacular.

My only visit was December 2017. After a day of sightseeing I ended up going to a pub called The Shakespeare and happened upon a conversation between a local and two Canadians.

The Canadians stared amazingly as we had about six pints each before criticising us for how much we drank. After they fupped off, the local invited me to a basement club where there was about ten Georgians and a Russian woman.

After fending off an approach from the Russian woman and us all singing trad songs (Fairytale of New York counts) and numerous rounds of traditional liqeur (brandy and Baileys) I became engrossed in conversation with one Georgian man who tells me about his interests, one of which was Eurovision – we add each other on FB and discover we have ten friends we know in real life…what are the odds…eh?

Unorthodox, way to go if you ask me…

Previously: Fluffybiscuits on Broadsheet

Pic: Getty