Author Archives: Admin

Vera Twomeyt’s daughter Ava has Dravets Syndrom,e an extremely rare drug resistant epilepsy.

Martin McMahon writes:

William Brooke O’Shaughnessy was born in Limerick in 1809. He first studied medicine at Trinity in Dublin before transferring to the University of Edinburgh in Scotland from where he graduated in 1829.

O’Shaughnessy joined the British East India Company in 1833 and moved to Calcutta, remaining in India for approximately nine years where he fulfilled the roles of surgeon, physician, professor of chemistry at Medical College and Hospital Kolkata.

His medical research led to the development of intravenous therapy and introduced the therapeutic use of Cannabis sativa to Western medicine.

O’ Shaughnessy established his reputation by successfully relieving the pain of rheumatism and stilling the convulsions of an infant with cannabis.

This led O’Shaughnessy to declare that “the profession has gained an anti-convulsive remedy of the greatest value”. In 1856 he was knighted by Queen Victoria.

Today, Vera Twomey is walking from Cork to Dublin to fight for medical cannabis for her daughter Ava who is denied access to medical cannabis by draconian and unnecessarily restrictive conditions established under Health Minister Simon Harris.

Thanks to a famous Limerick man we know the science is solid, it remains to be seen if the actions of a brave Cork woman can overcome these nonsensical and damaging restrictions.

You can follow Vera’s long walk on twitter #veratwomey

Martin blogs at RamshornRepublic

Petition: Medicinal Cannabis Leglislation To Save Our Daughter (Change.org)

Pics: Jim Coughlan

1835 Tribunals_90503801

TGroves

From top: Media outside Dublin Castle this morning ahead of the Disclosures Tribunal into the alleged smearing of garda whistlebower Maurice McCabe; Tony Groves

There will be individual embarrassing moments and several more mea culpas before we arrive at a consensus that a good man was done down by a system and that, because the system is to blame, nobody is to blame.

Tony Groves writes:

There’s a story, perhaps apocryphal, that while preparing for the biggest court case of his nascent career, Cicero spent his time practising only oration and voice projection.

When asked if he would not be better off spending his time learning the legal arguments for the case, he is said to have replied “Only a bad orator need learn to be a lawyer”.

Now this story is most likely baseless, but I couldn’t help thinking about it while watching the Garda Whistleblower controversy evolve. Thirty Six times Clare Daly, Luke Ming Flanagan and Mick Wallace raised concerns to the Dail, but it was only when RTE broadcast the widely known slurs, that the “government” deigned to actually address the issue.

When I say address it, I mean speak around it, throw shapes of indignation and then search for a vehicle to park it in, while they can get back to the business of making announcements and issuing plans that hope to lead to future announcements of updated plans.

There has arguably never been a more inefficient government, nor have we ever had a more unambitious opposition.

All of which leads me to the vehicle of a public inquiry and back to Cicero.

Up and down the country, Lawyers, Barristers and Public Relations Gurus are practising their oration and vocal projection. Headline writers can today file their copy for the upcoming Charleton Inquiry.

Words like Defiant, Refute and Rebut will be thrown around like “mea culpas” at a Fine Gael Parliamentary Party meeting. Phrases like “unaware of”, “not privy to”, “had no knowledge of” and “in the strongest possible terms” will be deemed acceptable answers to the most important questions.

All the while, we will be placated with fluff pieces that assure the public that the Judge has the “power to compel” and “ask the hard questions” that will “bring closure”.

Those responsible will point at the next person up in a vicious blame circle. Sincere expressions of sincere regret will be made that would make the Banking Inquiry blush.

There will be individual embarrassing moments and several more mea culpas before we arrive at a consensus that a good man was done down by a system and that because the system is to blame, nobody is to blame. Sure we all partied, on his good name.

Cicero won his case, he rose in esteem by defeating his rival orator (Hortensius) and climbed the rungs of power. The guilty party (Gaius Verres, Governor of Sicily) was sentenced to exile and was given the traditional nine days to squirrel away as much plunder to feather his retirement nest.

Our guilty parties will also be “exiled” and in the words of Oliver Callan be “subject to the full rigours of a massive pension”. Cicero said we must “let the welfare of the people be the ultimate law”.

Ultimately, I predict that the conspirators and the participants in this sinister plot will fare out very well.

The more things change, the more they stay the same.

Tony Groves is a full-time Financial Consultant and part-time commentator. With over 18 years experience in the Financial Industry and a keen interest in politics, history and “being ornery”, he has published one book and writes regularly at Trickstersworld

Rollingnews

golden-discs-dundrum

 

Every Friday, we give away a voucher conservatively valued at TWENTY FIVE big ones to spend at your leisure in any of the 14 Golden Discs stores nationwide.

The catch?

Simply give us a tune we can play on Monday at an unspecified time.

This week’s theme: Reggae

What song with has you theatrically bouncing on the spot in a ganja haze?

To enter, please complete this sentence”

“The greatest reggae track of all time is _______________________________because__________________’

Lines MUST close at 5.45pm MIDNIGHT on Sunday.

Jah rastafari.

Golden Discs