Author Archives: Admin

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…a holistic candle from the Candle Cottage is your only man.

‘Chandler’ Ingé writes:

I am a Kildare-based chandler, and create Holistic Soyabean Candles. My business is called Candle Cottage and my range includes Hot Oil Massage Candles (You actually pour these on your skin and come in seasonal blends), and Aromatherapy Candles (these you burn like any other candle with each one designed to stimulate a Chakra point)…

You had us at soyabean, in fairness.

Candle Cottage

Irish-made stocking fillers to broadsheet@broadsheet.ie marked ‘Irish-Made Stocking Fillers’. No fee

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Last week, we offered you the chance to win a fluttering €25 voucher for Golden Discs, usable at any of music giant’s 14 locations around the country.

We asked you to complete this sentence:

‘The finest exponent of the bass guitar in contemporary music would have to be_______________________especially during_____________________________’

It was another hard one to call…

But ‘Yer Man There’ has it.

The finest exponent of the bass guitar in contemporary music would have to be James Jamerson especially during the Motown era of Marvin Gaye. His playing is the stuff of legend, and not something that they teach in no fancy music schools. Listen to the way he carves out his own space by shifting ahead of the beat or behind it, or sitting on a note unexpectedly, while never sacrificing the groove or taking away from Marvin Gaye’s vocal (as if that was possible). An extremely influential musician who unfortunately never got the recognition he deserved and lived a poor, hard life.

Hard to argue, that.

Some more highlights from the going:

Yep: “The finest exponent of the bass guitar in contemporary music would have to be Victor Wooten, of Bela Fleck and the Flecktones especially during Amazing Grace. Showing mastery of technique while transforming the song from sonic bliss to infectious grove and everywhere between.”

Martin: “The finest exponent of the bass guitar in contemporary music would have to be Jaco Pastorius, especially during his life.”

Royal M: “The finest exponent of the bass guitar in contemporary music would have to be Geddy Lee of Rush especially during Digital Man from the Signals album.”

Birneybau2: “Stephen Morris, amazing. Bernard Sumner, terrible lyricist, amazing guitarist. Ian Curtis, one of the greatest. Peter Hook; ’nuff said.”

Serval: “The finest exponent of the bass guitar in contemporary music would have to be Andy Rourke, especially during This Charming Man.”

Thanks all

Bassists (above) clockwise from top left: James Jamerson;  Andy Rourke;  Victor Wooton; Jaco Pastorius;  Geddy Lee; Peter Hook.

No Mark King?

Thumb denial.

Golden Discs

Last week: All our Bass Are Belong To Us

poolbeg

 

Puca writes:

Walking my dog on extension lead in Sandymount [Dublin 4] yesterday evening and my dog was about 10 ft behind me (sniffing railings) and suddenly some guy comes jogging up from behind with a dog also on a lead. T

he two dogs snarl at bare teeth at each other. I immediately rein my dog in and apologise but the bearded jogger stops and asks

“What’s that about?”

I said I didn’t see them approaching from behind and apologised again but he persists

“What’s that about?”

When I say that I have already apologised and that he seems to be implying it was an intentional manoeuvre by me, he comes back with:

“Your dog attacked mine, I’m entitled to give you grief”

As if it’s a contract I have unwittingly signed. After some handbags, it all ended with his pithy:

“Oh fuck off.”

As he jogged away.

The encounter itself was mildly diverting, but his language describing his entitlement to give grief (as if I had not read the Ts & Cs of dog walking) was illuminating.

Have the unwritten rules of the social contract been replaced with an actual contract (entitlements and all)?

Anyone?

Rollingnews

Save Poolbeg

irishworkshop

Glittering neckwear handmade in Ireland ideally shaped to slip into free-hanging stockings.

Charmiane Kenny, at The Irish Workshop, online home for Irish crafts and whatnot, writes:

Still looking for that perfect gift? Or maybe you haven’t even started looking yet?! Either way, we’re here to help. With less than three weeks away to go to Christmas morning, we turn the spotlight to the work of three talented Irish jewellery designers:

1. Heart of Gold Pendant by MTW Jewellery, Co.Kilkenny

2. I Still Get the Butterflies Pendant by deBláca Jewellery, Dublin

3. Flow Pendant II by Miriam Wade, Co.Westmeath

For lots more Irish design and gift ideas check out The Irish Workshop [link below]…

The Irish Workshop

Irish-made stocking fillers to broadsheet@broadsheet.ie marked ‘Irish-Made Stocking Fillers’. No fee.

goldendiscs

 

With a Golden Discs voucher up for grabs we asked you to complete this sentence:

‘The most outstanding example of traditional music from the island of Ireland would have to be______________________________’

The competition was particularly stiff.

but there could only be one winner.

Scottser takes top prize for this probing analysis of The King of the Fairies by The Dubliners (above):

“This tune features a lovely modal device of introducing the sharpened 7th in a minor key, which is ordinarily proper to the major key. This play between major and minor is a very ‘gypsy’ feel, so nice and topical, given the current debate around traveller ethnicity. Oh, and John Sheahan is an absolute gentleman and a total legend.”

Runners up:

Harry Molloy:

“Would have to be the Tabhair Dom do Lámh by Planxty, bolted on to the end of the Raggle Taggle Gypsy. The bouzouki never sounded better! I remember when the Planxty Live at Vicar Street CD came out and was being advertised on TV, I heard a few people saying they would buy it based on that piece of music alone. Had it played at my wedding too.”

Eimear:

“The most outstanding example of traditional music from the island of Ireland would have to be Arthur McBride sang by Paul Brady. Every listen is akin to a shillelagh right in the feels.”

TheQ47:

 “The most outstanding example of traditional music from the island of Ireland would have to be Mise Éire by Seán Ó Riada, because it combines the best elements of traditional Irish music in the classical music style. It always reminds me of Sunday afternoons at home with my late Dad listening to this while I washed the dinner dishes, usually with me giving out because he was listening to “this rubbish” instead of RTÉ Radio 2, and him telling me I’d appreciate this good music some day. He was right. He was wrong about James Last though, he was rubbish.”

Real PolitHicks:

“For me, though, the most outstanding example of traditional music from the island of Ireland is this fine choon from the legendary Trad/Rock band Moving Hearts. I used to go see them play every week in The Baggot, back in the day. They were far better live than anything they ever recorded, they’d set your heart racing and your foot tapping.”

Penfold:

“The most outstanding example of traditional music from the island of Ireland would have to be Fester and Ailin’s Tropical Diseases. Voices like angels, and model good looks.”

Thanks all.

Golden Discs