Tag Archives: Housing

From top: Minister for Housing Darragh O’Brien; Social Democrat TD Cian O’Callaghan

Pluto?

Saturn?

Coruscant?

This morning.

Via Independent.ie:

Developers will be paid up to €120,000 per apartment by the State to fund the shortfall between spiralling building costs and current market prices.

The €500m fund is aimed at unblocking stalled developments and will see 5,000 apartments built between 2024 and 2026.

The move comes amid concern builders are not developing certain sites in cities due to the cost of construction.

Developers will have to apply to have their developments included in the fund and will receive a subsidy of up to €120,000 per apartment.

Taxpayers to fund new €120,000-per-apartment subsidy benefiting developers (Independent.ie)

Meanwhile…

… Social Democrats Housing Spokesperson Cian O’Callaghan said:

“It is bizarre and extraordinary that Housing Minister Darragh O’Brien intends gifting developers up to €120,000 per apartment – without securing any apparent benefit for the Exchequer.

“The State is bailing out developers, but they will still be seeking full market value when the apartments are sold. On what planet does this make any sense?

“If developers are in financial trouble and unable to complete developments, why doesn’t the State take over those developments and ensure the supply of social, affordable and cost-rental homes is increased.

“Instead, the Housing Minister will pay developers huge sums to complete these projects – without any reduction in the sale price being agreed. You couldn’t make this up.

“This government’s housing policies are replete with sweetheart deals for developers and this is yet another egregious example. Why is the ambition of this government, when it comes to housing, so pathetically weak? Why are they so eager to prop up developers and so loathe to take any radical action to support ordinary workers and families desperately seeking a home?”

Anyone?

RollingNews

From top: Baggott Street Hospital, Dublin 2: Housing Minister Darragh O’Brien

This morning.

Via Irish Times:

Temporary accommodation may be needed for up to three years for Ukrainian refugees, with each local authority mandated to develop a significant housing centre in their area.

….Minister for Housing Darragh O’Brien  told Cabinet that he intends to use legal powers available to him to heavily restrict local authorities’ capacity to waive rates, in an effort to combat vacancy.

Ministers were told that powers would be used to allow a range of temporary facilities to be built bypassing planning – including medical, residential, education and childcare facilities.

Ministers were told that each local authority will be asked to identify one building in public or private ownership and develop a plan for its refurbishment.

Several large buildings have already been identified, many of them Health Service Executive properties.

Cabinet was told they include Baggot Street hospital and former institutions St Ita’s in Dublin and St Loman’s in Mullingar, as well as St Brigid’s nursing home in south Dublin and St Peter’s in Castlepollard.

Temporary housing for Ukrainian refugees may be needed for up to three years (Irish Times)

RollingNews

Meanwhile…

This morning.

Meanwhile…

Developer Michael O’Flynn

Last night.

Prime Time on RTÉ One.

One of the country’s leading property developers has criticised plans to house Ukrainian refugees in temporary modular homes on State land.

Michael O’Flynn, CEO of the O’Flynn Group, said that the State should instead be considering more permanent housing solutions.

“Temporary modular buildings will be taken down in a number of years. That is not a solution,” Mr O’Flynn said.

It is hoped that construction will begin on the initial phase of 500 modular buildings as soon as possible, according to Housing Minister Darragh O’Brien.

“I cannot believe we’re going down that road,” Mr O’Flynn said.

Modular homes ‘not a solution’ for Ukrainian refugees – developer (RTE)

Minister for Housing, Local Government and Heritage, Darragh O’Brien

This morning.

Update:

The housing minister’s plan, which goes to Cabinet tomorrow, seeks to speed-up the assessment and refurbishment of both State and privately owned large vacant properties which could house refugees.

It is understood that 529 buildings are currently under consideration and more than 100 are viewed as having the capacity to come on-stream in the “very short term”.

It is believed Mr O’Brien’s memo seeks to streamline the management of how such large vacant properties can be processed and become operational.

An inter-departmental committee has already been established to oversee the management of the plan.

Earlier…

Via RTÉ News:

Minister for Housing Darragh O’Brien is to bring a number of options to Cabinet today on medium and long-term housing options in response to the refugee crisis.

RTÉ News understands that this includes an expanded “voids programme” whereby vacant social homes will be brought back into use.

The measures will also include an expanded acquisition programme where local authorities will have greater flexibilities to acquire certain homes.

The minister will also consider using emergency powers, already available to him under existing legislation, whereby certain planning and procurement requirements can be exempted, where required, to speed up delivery in emergency situations.

Vacant social homes to be used to house Ukrainian refugees (RTE)

RollingNews

Meanwhile…

Taoiseach Micheál Martin has said the Government is not contemplating a cap on the number of Ukrainian refugees arriving into Ireland.

Mr Martin said Ireland’s efforts were part of a Europe-wide response to the crisis, and while the country is not a military power, it can offer humanitarian assistance to protect women, children and vulnerable people.

He said Ireland’s response is still in the emergency stage, and it must be across all Government departments and agencies to ensure optimal co-ordination of the crisis.

It cannot be left to just one agency alone, he added.

Govt not contemplating cap on Ukrainian refugees – Taoiseach (RTE)

Housing Minister Darragh O’Brien

This morning.

Via RTÉ News:

Housing Ministersaid that during a meeting with industry stakeholders yesterday, all options available to house refugees were discussed.

There has been a trawl of vacant buildings that are available, he said, adding that about 500 of these were identified by local authorities.

“It’s most efficient to use the existing stuff that we have there,” Mr O’Brien added.

There are emergency procurement procedures that will be used to “get the work done”, he said, but with some buildings it will take months to complete.

Government examines payment for use of holiday homes to house refugees (RTE)

RollingNews

This morning/afternoon.

A report into available properties for those on Housing Assistance Programme (HAP)

Meanwhile…

…Social Democrats Housing Spokesperson Cian O’Callaghan. said:

“The ‘Locked Out’ report reveals that the housing crisis is getting worse, not better. The number of properties, affordable for HAP tenants to rent, is virtually non-existent unless top-ups on the rent are provided.

“The Housing Minister claims the provision of affordable housing is a priority for the government, but where is the evidence of that?

“House prices and rents are exponentially increasing, while the number of properties available to rent is shrinking rapidly. HAP tenants, who are unable to pay the runaway rents now being quoted in every part of the country, are among those most at risk of becoming homeless.

The standard HAP rate, which has not been increased since 2016, must now be increased as a matter of urgency. However, the only way to really resolve this crisis is to seriously ramp up the supply of social, affordable and cost-rental homes. The Minister promised to do this. When will he deliver on those promises?”

Report here

Simon Communities

This afternoon.

Dublin Castle, Dublin

Minister for Housing, Local Government and Heritage, Darragh O’Brien (above) and John O’Connor, Chair of The Housing Commission, after this morning’s meeting of the Housing Commission, which was launched in January and tasked with ‘bringing forward proposals for a referendum on housing’.

Advising the commission ‘with expertise in this area’ are Frank Clarke, Former Chief Justice, Professor Gerry Whyte, Professor of Law Trinity College Dublin, Professor Rosalind Dixon, Professor of Law University of New South Wales and Madeleine MacKenzie, Parliamentary Counsel in the Scottish Government’s Parliamentary Counsel Office.

None of whom is a landlord.

We assume.

Fight!

Minister for Housing, Local Government and Heritage welcomes establishment of Working Group on Referendum on Housing (Gov.ie)

Sasko Lazarov/RollingNews


This morning.afternoon.

Dail Eireann.

leaders’ Questions.

After accusations by Sinn Fein president Mary Lou McDonald of Fianna Fáil corruption in dealings with property developers and vulture funds,…

…Taoiseach Micheál Martin said Sinn Féin is the last party that can talk about corruption given the campaign of “murder and mayhem” it supported in Ireland.

Deputy McDonald responded:

“Go away outta that”

More whatouttaery.

FIGHT!

This morning.

Dublin Castle, Dublin 2.

Nattily-dressed Housing Minister James Corden Darragh O’Brien arrives for a cabinet meeting to sign off on changes to the mortgage to rent scheme (where a ‘social landlord’ buys your home allowing you to stay as a tenant and complete mortgage payments to the council or housing association). To wit:

Yesterday: Keeping The Roof

RollingNews

This afternoon.

Ireland’s Parliamentary Budget Office (PBO) has published a ‘snapshot’ of the housing market in 2021.

Viewer discretion advised.

Via RTÉ News:

From 2012-2020, it finds that average wages grew by 23% while house prices grew by 77%. For some, this is making house ownership “unachievable”, the report states.

It says high prices relative to incomes are “pushing potential buyers out of the market and into rental accommodation, social housing or emigration.”.

It notes that prices rose during the Celtic Tiger era at an average rate of 12.6% a year.

Prices rose by an average 7% a year from 2015-20.

The PBO cites the figure published by Banking Payments Federation Ireland last year that home ownership among those under 30 has collapsed from 60% in 2004 to 27% in 2020.

Using the Demographia International Housing Affordability Survey (DIHAS), which measures house prices against median incomes, it concludes that Irish house prices are “severely unaffordable” and have been for several years.

It says that housing affordability has worsened for renters, noting that rents are now 40% higher than their pre-crisis levels in Dublin, where rents have doubled in the past decade, and 20% higher in the rest of the country.

 

‘Collapse’ in home ownership among young adults – report (RTE)

RollingNews