Tag Archives: Irish Council for Civil Liberties

 Members of the Garda Riot Squad (Public Order Unit), during the National Emergency Service Parade in Dublin City Centre last September

This morning.

Via The Irish Council For Civil Liberties

ICCL travelled to Cork, Ennis and Dublin between 19 and 22 June to meet with environmental activists, anti-war protesters, anti-eviction groups, and activists living in Direct Provision. We also met with representatives of An Garda Síochána and relevant oversight bodies.

…We received reports of garda misuse of the Public Order Act (through arresting protesters and later dropping charges), of garda intimidation of protesters (through photography, following cars, harassment, and stop-and-search), of serious deficiencies in GSOC handling of complaints, and of gardaí imposing limits on where people can protest without a clear basis in law.

International standards state that sit-ins and meetings are protected by the right to protest and may extend to private spaces accessible to the public.

However, we heard a number of serious specific issues around protests at or near privately owned land – including during evictions and at Direct Provision centres.

We received reports that gardaí themeslves are evicting protesters from squats when media are not present. Protesters have also been arrested from public spaces such as city councils.

We received reports that gardaí have subjected those arrested at protests to treatment that interferes with their right to dignity, including psychological trauma, strip-searching and being forced to squat and cough.

Arrested protesters have allegedly been encouraged to give statements without lawyers present, and in some cases even denied access to their lawyers.

We are extremely concerned that the rights to assembly, to free expression and to free association are being curtailed by private operators of Direct Provision centres, allegedly with the support of An Garda Síochána.

Residents informed us that their meetings have been labelled “illegal”, that people have been escorted in handcuffs to public spaces where they are “allowed” to protest, and that food and benefits have been withheld in response to protests.

ICCL highlights urgent concerns for the right to protest following national consultation (ICCL)

Eamonn Farrell/Rollingnews

From top: Paschal Donohoe, then Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform, launches the Public Services Card (PSC) in 2016; Oireachtas justice committee, Anna Morgan and Jennifer O’Sullivan, of the Data Protection Commission; and Independents 4 Change TD Clare Daly

This morning.

Members of the Data Protection Commission are appearing before the Oireachtas justice committee which includes Independents 4 Change TDs Mick Wallace and Clare Daly.

In January the Department of Employment and Social Protection refused to release information with regard to the an investigation by the DPC into the legality of the public services card.

The request for the information was made by the the Irish Council for Civil Liberties.

Instead, the DPC confirmed to The Irish Times that the DPC doesn’t intend to publish its report in full.

This morning, the DPC told the committee they will publish final report with the department’s permission.

But the department has previously said it will not publish the report without the DPC’s permission.

In addition, asked if the DPC agrees with Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection Regina saying the Public Services Card doesn’t involve biometric data processing, the DPC representatives said they couldn’t comment.

Lawyer Elizabeth Farries, of the Irish Council for Civil Liberties, has been following this morning’s meeting and has said she’s disappointed with the answers given by the DPC members in response to certain questions.

Elizabeth tweetz:

Previously: ‘A Matter Of Urgent Importance’

Paschal Donohoe, then Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform, launches the Public Services Card (PSC) in 2016

This morning.

It’s being reported that the Department of Employment and Social Protection is refusing to release information with regard to an investigation by the Data Protection Commission into the legality of the public services card.

The request for information was made by the Irish Council for Civil Liberties.

In addition, the DPC has confirmed to The Irish Times that the DPC doesn’t intend to publish its report in full.

Instead it will publish a summary of its findings.

Elaine Edwards, in The Irish Times, reports:

A request from the Irish Council for Civil Liberties to the department asking it to release an interim investigation report by the commission into the card and connected projects has been rejected, on grounds that releasing it could reveal the department’s plans or have a significant adverse affect on its functions.

The ICCL call comes as the final stage of Government legislation which will allow wider sharing of personal data with organisations and agencies is set to be debated in the Dáil on Tuesday.

ICCL director Liam Herrick called for “full transparency on the legal basis for the public services card because it violates the privacy and data protection rights of people living in Ireland.

“We have been campaigning against its introduction because it’s unnecessary, costly, and of questionable efficacy – and it targets in particular economically vulnerable people, such as those dependant on social welfare. Further, it is deeply troubling that the Government has continued to roll the card out for essential services while a question hangs over its legality,” he said.

Ms Edwards also reported that the DPC sent the department “a draft confidential report” in recent months for comment and that this report contains “13 provisional findings on issues spanning legal basis to transparency matters”.

Further to this…

Solicitor Simon McGarr has tweeted his thoughts on the matter…

Meanwhile…

Nurse Polly has also tweeted her experience of having to get a card.

UPDATE:

Department refuses to release details of public services card inquiry (The Irish Times)

Rights group challenge over public services card (The Times Ireland)

Previously: Thank You, Nurse Polly

Rollingnews

From top: Members of the Garda Riot Squad (Public Order Unit), during the National Emergency Service Parade on September 1 in Dublin city ; Alyson Kilpatrick’s report for the Irish Council of Civil Liberties and Ms Kilpatrick

This morning.

At the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission on Green Street, Dublin 7.

Former human rights advisor to the Policing Board of Northern Ireland, Alyson Kilpatrick BL presented her report A human rights-based approach to policing in Ireland – for which she was commissioned by the Irish Council for Civil Liberties.

In her report, Ms Kilpatrick writes:

A human rights-based approach is necessary because it is required by law. In Ireland, the European Convention on Human Rights Act 2003 requires An Garda Síochána to perform its functions in a manner compatible with the state’s obligations under the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR).

Moreover, a human rights-based approach is the best means of securing the reform of policing that is desired and needed. It is effective in securing a professional, lawful, democratic and accountable police service that respects and values the people it is there to serve while effectively combating crime and maintaining order.

It will help secure police legitimacy and therefore enhance safety and security. A human rights-based approach puts the rights of individuals and protected groups, enshrined at law by the ECHR,3 at the centre of every decision and action of the Garda Síochána and gardaí.

…If police are to build (or rebuild) trust they must behave so as to secure the confidence, approval and support of the public – willingly – by their professional, human rights compliant approach which respects democracy and the rule of law.

Trust in the police can be easily undermined, particularly when public order operations end in violence.

Scenes of police battling with protesters for example will be beamed across the country, drawing observers into a debate about the very legitimacy of the policing operation and the legitimacy of police themselves.

The police will be compelled to justify their actions by reference to the law and human rights principles. Without a ready willingness to explain, provide justification and answer questions the police will be pitched against the community it is there to serve.

Unanswered questions will invite speculation and silence will result in conspiracy theories. Tactics will be discussed and criticised by those who urge a harder edged policing response and by those who condemn the police for their over-use and/or misuse of power.

An Garda Síochána does not make its policy directives, training, strategy, decision-making logs or de-briefs available for public scrutiny.

In other words, the framework within which the garda operate is entirely hidden from the public.

There has been published an overarching policy directive on public order incident command but it is general in nature. It does contain the statement that it is “the aim of An Garda Siochana to uphold and protect the human and constitutional rights of everyone” but there is little in terms of practical guidance on how that will be achieved.

The garda’s policing of protest has given rise to concern among the public about tactics and potential political interference in policing operations but remains shrouded in secrecy.

The report can be read in full here

Pics: Eamonn O’Farrell/Rollingnews and ICCL 

 

From top: 34 Frederick Street North, Dublin last night; Garda Commissioner Drew Harris

This afternoon.

The Irish Council for Civil Liberties has released a statement in regards to the removal of housing activists from 34 Frederick Street North, Dublin 1 last night – which the group says involved “over disproportionate and unaccountable tactics”.

They write:

The Irish Council for Civil Liberties (ICCL) is today demanding answers from An Garda Síochána over the tactics used during an eviction of housing rights activists from a building at North Frederick Street in Dublin’s North Inner City last night.

ICCL is calling for a swift public report from the Garda Commissioner regarding the Gardaí’s decision-making in advance of last night’s operation, and the reasons for and circumstances of the arrests and alleged injuries sustained by protesters.

Liam Herrick, Executive Director of the ICCL said:

ICCL has been highlighting the lack of transparency regarding the Gardaí’s policies and tactics in the areas of protest policing and use of force. We are calling on the Garda Commissioner to provide answers about what decisions were taken in advance of, and during, last night’s operation.

We want to know: what was the legal basis for the Garda operation? Was it on request of the owner? What are the protocols for such requests? Was there engagement with the occupiers in advance of the Garda operation? What consideration was there of the need to use minimal force? What was the basis for the arrests?

ICCL demands answers from Gardaí over disproportionate and unaccountable tactics used at North Frederick Street eviction (Irish Council for Civil Liberties)

Meanwhile…

“What we have seen raises concerns about possible excessive and unnecessary use of force against what appear to be largely peaceful protestors. Whenever the lawful use of force by An Garda Síochána is unavoidable, it must be used with restraint and in proportion to the seriousness of the law enforcement objective.

Gardaí should only facilitate and support the actions of private security personnel where they are lawful and do not involve excessive force. In this regard, it is of concern that the private security personnel reportedly failed to display identity badges, as required under section 30 of the Private Security Services Act.

We urge that these events be investigated as a matter of urgency to ascertain if human rights abuses were committed, and if so, ensure appropriate action.”

Fiona Crowley, Research and Legal Manager for Amnesty International Ireland this afternoon.

Earlier: Second-Hand Import?

How Can You Justify These Actions?

Yesterday: What’s Going On Here?

Eamonn Farrell/Rollingnews