Tag Archives: portrait

A ‘visual excavation’ of Western history by British photographer Drew Gardner wherein descendants of historically significant people pose,  recreating  famous portraits of their ancestor.

But there’s more going here than mock-ups. The photograph of Shannon LaNier (top pic) is especially significant.

He’s the sixth-great grandson of Jefferson and Sally Hemmings, who the third U.S. president enslaved and forced to bear his children, a story that’s long been left out of historical narratives.

(From top: Shannon LaNier, Jefferson’s sixth-great grandson; Hugo de Salis, fourth-great grandson of Napoleon. Napoleon in his study, by Jacques-Louis David, 1812; Helen Pankhurst, great granddaughter of women’s rights activist Emeline Pankhurst; Tom Wonter, Wordsworth’s fourth-great grandson. William Wordsworth, portrait by William Shuter, 1798; Gerald Charles Dickens, Dickens’ great, great grandson. Charles Dickens, portrait by Herbert Watkins, 1858; Isambard Thomas, Brunel’s third-great grandson. Isambard Kingdom Brunel, portrait by Robert Howlett, 1857; Irina Guicciardini Strozzi, the 15th great granddaughter of Lisa del Giocondo. The Mona Lisa by Leonardo DaVinci.)

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The adorable, slightly unnerving, big-eyed hybrids of Japanese artist Naoto Hattori.

Most a mere 7.5cm square, the highly detailed surreal acrylics reflect an obsession with eyes that has stayed with the artist since he was three years old. Sez he:

“When I closed my eyes, I could see a colourful eye like a mandala and it kept changing shape like a kaleidoscope. I drew hundreds of the eye images. Back then, I was thinking that it was something everyone could see.”

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Winners (and runners up) in the 2019 Audubon Photography Awards.

From top: a camouflaged owl by Shari McCollough; two Great Blue Herons by Melissa Rowell; Kevin Ebi’s shot of a Bald eagle and a fox battling for possession of a rabbit (see how it all turned out here) and the Grand Prize Winner – a red-winged blackbird ‘blowing smoke rings’ by Katherine Swoboda, who explains:

I visit this park near my home to photograph blackbirds on cold mornings, often aiming to capture the “smoke rings” that form from their breath as they sing out. On this occasion, I arrived early on a frigid day and heard the cry of the blackbirds all around the boardwalk. This particular bird was very vociferous, singing long and hard. I looked to set it against the dark background of the forest, shooting to the east as the sun rose over the trees, backlighting the vapour.

In fairness…

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