Tag Archives: resignation

Yikes.

Via Thomas Colson

Related: Dominic Raab becomes new Brexit secretary after David Davis resigns – politics live (The Guardian)

Meanwhile…

Earlier: A Limerick A Day

Former Garda Commissioner Noirin O’Sullivan and Acting Garda Commissioner Donal O’Cualain leaving a meeting of the Joint Oireachtas Committee on Justice and Equality in March; Justice Minister Charlie Flanagan; tweet by Fine Gael TD and Minister for Employment and Social Protection Regina Doherty yesterday

This morning.

In light of Noirin O’Sullivan’s resignation yesterday evening from her role as Garda Commissioner…

Justice Minister Charlie Flanagan was interviewed by Paul Cunningham on RTÉ’s Morning Ireland.

He said he wasn’t surprised by her resignation and that the possibility of it was made known to him in recent weeks.

He also said “there’s lots happening” in terms of reforming An Garda Siochana.

From the interview:

Charlie Flanagan:I wasn’t surprised at the news. The possibility the commissioner O’Sullivan might retire was flagged to me over the last couple of weeks. Of course it was treated as confidential until such time as the commissioner made her decision which was indicated to me approximately at 5pm to me yesterday evening.”

Paul Cunningham: “Because it was of interest, in the Irish Independent, John Downing was just noting that in the past week you were asked in one interview, on four occasions, but you avoided saying whether she would be in the job this time next year. You mentioned you had some inkling over the past weeks, where did those inklings come from?

Flanagan: “I understand that there were some discussions, having regard for the fact that the commissioner said that she would devote much of her summer break to giving consideration to whether or not she’d continue as Garda Commissioner and whether such continuing would be the right thing for her to do. In the course of that, there were discussions with officials from my department.”

Cunningham:Did you contact her and ask her to stay because only in the past couple of days, your cabinet colleague, Minister [Regina] Doherty said that the Garda Commissioner had the vision and the grit that was needed.”

Flanagan:No I didn’t, I haven’t been speaking to the Garda Commissioner since before she took her summer break at the end of July.”

Cunningham: “The TD from the Social Democrats, Roisin Shortall, said that the commissioner had lost all credibility and authority and it was very difficult to comprehend why the Government continued to defend her. Why didn’t you move earlier? Why did you not recognise that her position was untenable?

Flanagan:She was the Garda Commissioner, she was engaged in the process of reform. She took a break over the summer months, she was back at her desk last week. I had intended meeting her this week. Obviously there are urgent issues to be discussed – the programme of reform, the five-year action plan, the Garda Inspectorate Report, Changing Policing In Ireland, but obviously the Garda Commissioner took a decision that she felt was the right thing to do, to retire, and of course I accepted that.

“And this morning I will be making contact with the Policing Authority so as we can set in train the process of finding her replacement. In the meantime, I’m very pleased that Deputy Commissioner Donal O’Cualain will now act as police commissioner with all the powers and role and function that Noirin O’Sullivan had.”

Cunningham: “Before we come to that come to that question of process because it’s vitally important, can I just ask you whether you accept what Jim O’Callaghan, of Fianna Fail, said last night, that the resignation was effectively some accountability within An Garda Siochana for the 1.5million fake breath tests.”

Flanagan: “Well. I want to acknowledge here that this has been a very, very difficult time for the Garda Siochana, there are a number of inquiries, there’s a tribunal and, you know, I’m under no illusion here. The scale of reform here, and the need to move with a certain urgency is essential. But, from what I see, from both Garda management and from frontline gardai on a daily basis is that they have the appetite to see change and it’s up to us as political leaders to ensure we can drive change.

“And that’s why, just before I took office, my predecessor [Frances Fitzgerald] introduced the Future of Policing [commission] which is now considering all aspects of the garda service and all functions of the garda service and indeed the many oversight bodies whom I’ve been meeting in the course of the summer, the Policing Authority, the Garda Inspectorate, the Garda Siochana Ombudsman Commission  and, you know, I will ensure that we will coordinate a programme of reform which is both urgent and important in Garda Siochana. And I believe it’s important too, that the reform programme now gains a certain momentum and that, of course, in no circumstances, would its credibility be adversely affected or undermined.”

Cunningham:The Taoiseach said that the Government was now going to see how best to accelerate the crucial and essential reform programme. Why aren’t you doing that already? Why are we only going to accelerate it now?

Flanagan: “Oh, well, we are doing it already. We have the report from December 2015, Changing Policing In Ireland; 18 main recommendations  in relation to the structure of An Garda Siochana; the manner in which practices are deployed; culture of the Garda Siochana; human resources; financial management; all Garda practices and, of course, I’m looking forward to this year’s budget for next year when we can continue to ensure the acceleration of recruitment, both new garda siochana going in for training in Templemore graduating, at the earliest opportunity and also the further civilianisation of the garda organisation and the roll-out of modern policing. So there’s lots happening.”

Listen back in full here

Previously: She’s Gone

How Did He Get Here?

Absence Of Malice

Related:  Minister: Garda Commissioner is ‘incredible role model for women’ (The Irish Times)

Earlier this afternoon.

Scenes from inside the Dáil chamber after Taoiseach Enda Kenny gave his resignation speech, followed by speeches about Kenny’s tenure from party leaders and party representatives.

Meanwhile…

Solidarity TD Ruth Coppinger raised the case highlighted in yesterday’s Irish Times by Kitty Holland.

About how a young pregnant girl, who was at risk of suicide, was sectioned – after she sought an abortion.

Ruth Coppinger: “Taoiseach, honesty in politics is important so I’m not going to engage in fake, back-slapping. I will congratulate you on writing your own speech which I believe you did. I was a bit bemused at you mentioning Michael Davitt, a revolutionary and a socialist but we’ll leave that aside.

“In summing up your legacy, Taoiseach, I could focus on six years on unprecedented austerity, suffered by the many to bail out the few or the massive homeless and health crisis that you’re laving in your wake. Or indeed the crisis in the gardai and in the State.

“But, in the short time I have and the day that’s in it, I’ll pick one issue that sums up completely the type of Ireland that you and the establishment that you’ve so ably represented have bequeathed in the five decades you’ve been in the Dáil. And that is the incarceration, internment and imprisonment of a vulnerable, pregnant teenager, who asked for an abortion and who asked for help.

“And although we know little of the circumstances, we do know this: A pregnant child shouldn’t be forced to have a child. A pregnant child, in legal terms, is a raped child. The pregnant person best knows how they feel about being pregnant. And, Taoiseach, people around the country are comparing this outrage are comparing this to an episode of The Handmaid’s Tale.

Twenty-five years ago, this nation rose up at the incarceration of a teenage rape victim but it’s still happening under your watch because you did nothing to make sure it wouldn’t happen again.

“The much heralded Protection of Life During Pregnancy Act that you and the Labour party boast about has proven impossible for any suicidal person to access an abortion because they’re put through an inquisition. Their feelings are ignored and their rights to bodily and mental autonomy are completely ignored. And this happened last year. We do not know what happened to this girl, whether she succeeded in getting an abortion or whether she was forced to remain pregnant.

Now Taoiseach, we’ve a history in this country, it’s been mentioned today, of incarcerating pregnant women and girls and we thought that that era was over but many people have been outraged over what they’ve found out over the last 24 hours – that a psychiatrist would have the power, with their own views, to section a girl for the crime of wanting not to be pregnant.

“It seems it’s an illness warranting being locked up, to want an abortion. Not alone that, Taoiseach, but it appears a judge adjudicated and heard this case and awarded a guardian to the girl and, wait for it, her foetus. Now…”

Ceann Comhairle Seán Ó Fearghaíl: “I don’t want to interfere with any member’s contribution today. But I’m afraid you’re venturing into territory that is completely at odds with the business that’s before us today.”

Coppinger:With the legacy of the Taoiseach?

Ó Fearghaíl: “I, you’re talking about a specific case which none of us have full information.”

Coppinger: “Yeah. I, ok, thank you, Ceann Comhairle, I’ll bear that in mind. I’m going by the information that we do have and I’m just generalising now. So, not alone that Taoiseach, a judge adjudicated on the case, as I said. But Taoiseach, you’re going and what I hope is the reactionary policies are going with you. That the backwardness that was visited on young people in this country for so many decades will also go. You’ve had your time, hopefully we’ll have a different time.

“That the yearning there is for a different type of society among young people in particular, can be brought about. And, in finishing Taoiseach, I hope we see a movement now to bring about the separation of Church and State and the type of legislation that gives the person involved the right to make this decision for themsevels. And, hopefully, that movement won’t take very long.

With your new incumbent, we’ll find out but I certainly would encourage people to actively ensure that it happens because we can’t trust the people in this Dail to ensure that these cases don’t happen again.”

Watch back in full here

Previously: ‘Not The Solution’

Meanwhile, in London…

The cosmic ballet continues.

Further to announcing his resignation as Northern Ireland’s Deputy First Minister earlier this afternoon.

In an interview with journalists, Martin McGuinness declined to answer if he will run in the next Northern Ireland election.

Earlier: Martin McGuinness Resigns

Via Mark Simpson

UPDATE:

First Minister Arlene Foster has released the following statement…

“I am disappointed that Martin McGuinness has chosen to take the position he has today. His actions have meant that, at precisely the time we need our Government to be active, we will have no government and no way to resolve the RHI problems.”

“It is clear that Sinn Féin’s actions are not principled, they are political.”

“Let me make it clear the DUP will always defend unionism and stand up for what is best for Northern Ireland and it appears from the Deputy First Minister’s resignation letter that is what annoys Sinn Féin the most.”

 

 

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Related: Fine Gael TD Brian Walsh will not seek re-election (RTE, November 10, 2015)

Brian Walsh (Fine Gael)

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Fine Gael TD Sean Conlon who has this afternoon resigned from the party

Fine Gael TD Sean Conlon, from Cavan/Monaghan, has resigned from the party, following on from the resignation of Fine Gael councillor in Co. Monaghan, Hughie McElvaney last night.

The Irish Independent reports:

“Mr Conlan said he is leaving because of Fine Gael’s failure to listen to his constituents’ views on the North South Interconnector pylon project, which will see hundreds of pylons constructed in his constituency.”

“You feel that you represent your party as best you can. My father,  my grandfather were all involved in Fine Gael and you are always proud to be involved in Fine Gael and represent Fine Gael but sometimes you feel Fine Gael is not supporting you,” he said.

Meanwhile…

‘Sometimes you feel Fine Gael is not supporting you’ – TD Sean Conlan dramatically quits the party (Irish Independent)

One of Ireland’s longest serving Councillors last night resigned from his Party over Eirgrid’s Interconncetor project (Northern Sound)

Rollingnews.ie

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Britain’s Foreign Office minister Baroness Sayeeda Warsi, top, has sent her resignation letter to Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron, above, over Britain’s “morally indefensible” position on the conflict in Gaza.

Baroness Warsi Quits Over Gaza: First Interview With Former Foreign Office Minister (Huffington Post UK)

Sayeeda Warsi

callinan

In the best interests of An Garda Síochána and my family, I have decided to retire. I felt that recent developments were proving to be a distraction from the important work that is carried out by An Garda Síochána on a daily basis for the citizens of the State in an independent and impartial manner. Having joined An Garda Síochána in May of 1973, it has been a great honour and privilege to have spent nearly 41 years as a member of this tremendous organisation, serving the people of Ireland.

Those nearly 41 years, though at times challenging, have been enjoyable and fulfilling. This is due to the standard of people I have worked for, worked with, and led during this period of time. The work I carried out throughout my career could not have been done without the support of numerous men and women, and for this I would like to thank all who I have worked with during my service. It also could not have been achieved without the support of the many thousands of members of public who I have come in contact with and who I hope I have helped in some small way during my career.

Since becoming Commissioner in 2010 I have never failed to be impressed by the dedication of all serving members and civilian staff even when they faced significant professional and personal challenges. The last four years have seen major changes in An Garda Síochána, which were always done in the best interest of the community for whom we do our job. Although some of these changes have not always been easy, statistics from the CSO have shown that they have resulted in a reduction in crime throughout the country. This change in delivery of a policing service has, I hope, provided communities and individuals with a sense of safety and security in their daily lives.

I would like to thank the members of An Garda Síochána who I worked with during my time as Commissioner for their support and willingness to adapt for the benefit of the citizens of the State. I have great confidence that the delivery of an excellent policing service by excellent people will continue as it has done since An Garda Síochána’s foundation. I wish my successor, current members of An Garda Síochána, and those due to join later this year my continuing best wishes and wholehearted support.

Via Richard Chambers

Previously: Commish Hits The Fan

Laura Hutton/Photocall Ireland

marina

For the last two years Marina Shifrin worked for a boss who placed little value on creativity and content. Naturally, instead of quitting the conventional way, she made a video.

2.136 million views so far.

How d’you like them apples, boss?

awesomer/to