Tag Archives: BBC

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson

Laura Kuenssberg, of BBC, tweetz:

PM [Boris Johnson] putting down motion for a general election to be voted on on Monday, to take place on 12th December – No 10’s gambit is that if Labour agrees, then they will timetable Brexit bill again with time for scrutiny until 6th November when they want to dissolve Parliament.

Boris Johnson pushes for December 12 general election (ITV)

Chief Constable at the Police Service of Northern Ireland Simon Byrne

Last night.

The BBC reported:

The Chief Constable [of the PSNI] Simon Byrne has told Boris Johnson the PSNI will not police any customs checkpoints on the Northern Ireland border after Brexit.

Mr Byrne had a 30 minute video call with the prime minister last Friday.

He also told Mr Johnson he had “no plans to put police officers on any one of 300 crossings” along the border.

Brexit: PSNI ‘won’t police customs checkpoints’, says chief constable (BBC)

Pic: BBC

Clockwise from top left: Graham Norton, Ryan Tubridy, John Humphreys and Seán O’Rourke

‘eoin’ writes

In the UK (population 65m, 13x Ireland), the BBC publishes the list of staff paid £150,000+ (€168,000) a year in the year to April 2019 (that is, for a period which ended three months ago)….

John Humphrys, a titan of broadcasting whose daily 3-hour radio show gets around 5m listeners is paid £290,000 (€325,000)

In Ireland, Sean O’Rourke was paid €308,964 by loss-making RTE in the year to December 2016.

Meanwhile, Graham Norton only gets £610,000 while the mediocrity on the loss-making RTE Late Late Show gets €495,000 (excluding royalties on his book which exploits the Toy Show “jumper” thing)?

Also if the BBC can publish presenter salaries within 3 months of the year end, why does it take loss-making RTE 22 months?

Here’s the full list of BBC on-air stars earning over £150,000

BBC pay: Claudia Winkleman, Zoe Ball and Vanessa Feltz among top earners (BBC)

Related: Vanessa Foran: Reeling In The Year

Danny Baker fired by BBC over royal baby chimp tweet (BBC)

Meanwhile

Yikes.

Via Thomas Colson

Related: Dominic Raab becomes new Brexit secretary after David Davis resigns – politics live (The Guardian)

Meanwhile…

Earlier: A Limerick A Day

From top: Dee Forbes, Director general of RTÉ and Tony Hall, Director general of the BBC; Vanessa Foran

When RTÉ made their YE 201E available my quick scan had a predictable response; everything is as expected. Glossy, full of talk about themselves, the movements on the balance sheet to reflect the well-known sale of land, and of course Dee Forbes’ salary.

So rather than file it under a Broadsheet standard “nothing to see here” tag I decided to measure a few values against another national broadcaster reliant on statutory licence fees; the BBC.  One presents Financial Statements as Group, the Other as Consolidated. RTÉ have a Calendar Year End, the BBC have a March YE.

While scanning both I was indeed mindful to the size and reach of both organisations, alongside the licence fee income and the global reach of one, and the advertising income opportunities of the other.

Therefore, I only used total income over a full 12 month trading period as a denominator rather than split out, and convert into a single currency needed for a proper drill down. Which would be meaningless to a large degree anyway, as one would be including direct costs for special events ie. Brexit Referendum and both values are compiled from very mixed reporting periods.

So, in so far as a quick drive-by evaluation would allow, here some stats that might be considered as reasonable benchmarks within that industry.

Please also bear in mind, I have only picked off a few to run simple Ratio Analysis calculations against. The purpose of published accounts and reports of any organisation is to allow all stakeholders access themselves and form their own opinions, so here is what was interesting to me.

Some 95% of the BBC’s total expenses in the 12 months ending March 2017 was spent on Content and Delivery; in real terms, 5% is what comes out of their total income to run the organisation’s back office functions.

To put this in context; RTÉ reports a total Income of €337.6 million; of which €27.365m was spent on Acquired Programming; 8% if you are wondering. This does not include Sport Copyrights & Licences if you were wondering that too; 5.5% of total income by the way.

For those who might assume that Acquired Programming refers to content subbed in from local production companies and sub-contractors, let me also provide this figure – €38.62m for Direct Acquired Programme Costs; or 11.4% of total income.

Thankfully the RTÉ report provides an easily interpreted graphic to give you an idea of how many are employed by the Television dept:

An interesting question is how much of its overall programming hours are fulfilled by these Acquired Programming and Direct Acquired Programming expenditure items.

Meanwhile, to get a look at another suite of cost:total income tests here’s one of the old reliables; Executive & Board Renumeration.

Total Board costs as a % of Total Income: BBC .06% (.0006 of total Income) RTE .1% (.001). Dee Forbes’ 338k v Tony Hall’s 467K; one hundredth of RTÉ’s total income: one thousandth of the BBC’s.

That above should be digested alongside with this; Dee Forbes leads an organisation that in its last set of accounts reported €337.6 million income, of which 55% is Licence Fees, and employs (average WTE for year) 1,924 people.

Whereas Tony Hall is responsible for almost 21,000 employees (over 10 times more than Ms Forbes) and for an organisation that collects st£3.74billion from UK Licence payers and earns itself another st£1.2billion (again way over 10 times more than Ms Forbes.)

As a % of income and staff complement there is absolutely no arguing the value of money lapse just on this benchmark alone. But I would add that Tony Hall is probably being short-changed.

Yes, I know this is flame-throwing. But it is worth noting nonetheless that straight away the TV Licence Payers in the UK get significantly more out of their National Broadcaster than the Irish Licence Payer.

RTÉ is on a road to nowhere which only exposes the Irish Taxpayer to further financial risks. It needs to radically change every way it does business and at every level within the organisation. It continues to achieve cost cuts and they have the graphic to prove it:

But even this alongside the carving from the Land & Buildings on its balance sheet, they are only fooling themselves if they think realising cash here is all they need to do. The entity’s costs are still not under control when it is having to sell its silver rather than innovate.

Commissioning a new season of a series they have not already managed to sell on is pointless and not in any way strategic or wise programming; you can also read this as using tax payers’ money to invest further in a loss-making product.

They need to develop products they can export and they need to relocate from probably the most valuable real-estate in the country instead of this piecemeal selling off from Financial Year to Financial Year. But more importantly they need their own programming to win back their viewers.

The most watched show in YE 2017 was the Late Late Toy Show; which at least is their own format, albeit older than me, probably.  But its viewership is not loyal since the Toy Show is followed in the top 10 by a series of GAA All-Irelands and World Cup Play-Offs; all of which they have to compete for. Notably, the only scripted show in last year’s top ten was Mrs Brown/s New Year’s whatever. That probably makes my point.

If you are interested there is one measure between the two that is exactly spot on and nose to nose; both reports are a 192 pages long.

Vanessa Foran is a principal at Recovery Partners. Follow Vanessa on Twitter: @vef_pip /a>. Vanessa will be on Broadsheet on the Telly tonight at 10pm.

Footnote: Vanessa writes: The BBC Management and Talent personnel don’t seem to suffer from the shyness their counterparts in RTE do when it comes to declaring their income. Here  is a tidy and well-presented transparent document detailing everyone employed or engaged by the BBC in Year Ending March 2017 in the 150K brackets.

In London.

Sligo’s Laura Gaynor, who’s working as a production trainee at BBC, takes us on a tour of BBC’s HQ.

As Gaeilge.

Yay!

Previously: From Sligo To London

Laura Gaynor on Broadsheet

Laura Gaynor tweetz:

The BBC Production Trainee Scheme opened for applications this morning! More info on . Here’s a little video of my journey from Sligo to New Broadcasting House in London (watch with sound)

Yay!

Laura Gaynor on Broadsheet

DUP leader Arlene Foster on BBC

BBC reports:

Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar “should know better” than to “play around” with Northern Ireland over Brexit, the leader of the Democratic Unionist Party says.

Arlene Foster accused Mr Varadkar of being “reckless” as Brexit talks enter a “critical phase”.

She was speaking after meeting Theresa May at Downing Street.

The Irish government says any hard border with Northern Ireland should be off the table.

…Speaking to BBC political editor Laura Kuenssberg, Mrs Foster said: “Some people are taking their moment in the sun, to try and get the maximum in relation to the negotiations – and I understand that but you shouldn’t play about with Northern Ireland particularly at a time when we’re trying to bring about devolved government again.”

WATCH INTERVIEW: Irish PM should know better over Brexit, says Arlene Foster (BBC)

Yesterday: Leo’s Day In The Sun

BBC

BBC News’ top salary earners

Further to the BBC pay reveal…

Conor asks:

Am I alone in thinking the salaries (above) for these world class journalists and correspondents are fairly modest compared to what Sean O’Rourke, Joe Duffy Ray D’Arcy, Miriam O’Callaghan  John Murray, Ryan Tubridy and, of course, Marian [Finucane] have been getting for years?  I thought they would be on a lot more and our lot on considerably less….

This is how BBC top stars’ pay compares to salaries at ITV and Sky (Independent)

Meanwhile…

RTÉ’s latest accounts

NamaWinelake writes:

RTE annual report 2016. Loss of €20m. RTE blames 1916 commemoration. But average pay rose 8% from €77k to €84k…There’s no detail on the €108m receipt from recent sale of Montrose. How many redundancy millionaires is RTE now creating?

Anyone?