Tag Archives: Boris Johnson

Simon Coveney with then British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs and the Commonwealth Affairs Boris Johnson in the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, in Dublin, November 2017

This morning.

The outcome of the ballot of about 160,000 Tory members will be revealed at just before midday in London with the victor officially becoming prime minister on Wednesday.

Jeremy Hunt was in a positive mood when he arrived home from a run this morning despite Boris Johnson remaining the clear favourite to take over from Theresa May.

A Johnson win could spark more government resignations after Sir Alan Duncan quit as Foreign Office minister on Monday in protest at his expected victory, predicting a “crisis of government”.

Chancellor Philip Hammond and justice secretary David Gauke have given notice that they will resign rather than serve under Johnson.

Tory leadership Conbtest Live (The Guardian)

Rollingnews

Anthony Coughlan

An open Letter to anti-Brexit Irish Times columnist Fintan O’Toole from Anthony Coughlan, director of the strongly Euroseptic National Platform EU Research and Information Centre.

Dear Fintan,

You conclude an article (Boris Johnson is the fool who would play the king, June  18) attacking Boris Johnson in the “Irish Times” by asking “Who better to speak for a reckless and decadent ruling class for whom everything is desperate but nothing is serious?”

This implies that you believe that the British “ruling class” backs Brexit, but is that really so? And are “reckless” and “decadent” really the apt adjectives?

I would have thought that the real situation is that what one might broadly term the British “ruling class” has up to now been predominantly supportive of “Remain”, but that the majority of UK citizens who voted to take back control of their law-making from Brussels by backing “Leave” in the 2016 referendum gave democratic legitimacy to the minority of the ruling class which favours Brexit.

It is this popular democratic vote that legitimises Brexit and it is presumably the reason why your own newspaper and many others who do not like Brexit want a second referendum in the hope that it will overturn the result of the first, as was done here with Nice Two in 2002 and Lisbon Two in 2009.

The economic side of the British ruling class – namely the City, the CBI, High Finance and Big Business generally – overwhelmingly backed “Remain” in the 2016 referendum and largely do that still.

The political side – namely Prime Minister David Cameron’s Government, most Tory Ministers and MPs at the time, plus their Blairite opposite numbers in the Labour Party, plus the senior British Civil Service, were also “Remainers” and many still are, although the more democratically minded among them realise now that, with the departure of Theresa May, they must accept and implement the referendum result or else see the electoral destruction of the Tory Party, the principal party of Britain’s “ruling class”.

Of course one might also say that Britain’s ruling class is to some extent divided on the EU and always has been.

When the UK first applied to join the then EEC in 1961 Labour’s Hugh Gaitskell criticized the Tory Harold Macmillan for proposing to abandon “a thousand years of history”.

Later, in the 1973-5 period, the Tory Enoch Powell and Labour’s Tony Benn opposed Edward Heath and Harold Wilson as they brought Britain into the EEC and kept it there.

I shared No-side platforms with the Tory Sir Richard Body and Labour’s Peter Shore and Tony Benn at various meetings in London during Harold Wilson’s referendum on staying in the then EEC in 1975 – the first ever UK referendum – when two-thirds of those voting voted to remain in the EEC.

At that time that there were only two major British journals backing the No side – the communist party “Morning Star” and the Tory weekly “Spectator”. The rest of the media, from “The Sun” to the “Financial Times”, strongly favoured staying in the EEC.

As I expect you know, it was the USA that originally fathered Eurofederalism. The first supranational community, the European Coal and Steel Community of 1951, was pushed by the Americans as an economic underpinning of NATO in Europe and to reconcile France to German rearmament at the start of the Cold War.

The CIA financed the European Movement for years. Later John F. Kennedy pushed Harold Macmillan into applying to join the then EEC following the 1956 Suez debacle.

In so far as the British “ruling class” had independent ambitions at that time I would say that it hoped that by joining the EEC it would either divide France from Germany or else be co-opted by France and Germany into a triumvirate that would help run “Yurrup”, as Edward Heath used call it, together.

Disillusionment at the failure to achieve either of those objectives is surely one of the elements in Tory rejection of the supranational EU “project”.

May I respectfully suggest that “Irish Times” readers deserve a more sophisticated analysis of the reasons for the shift in British “ruling class” and popular attitudes between 1975 and 2016 than to ascribe that change to press columns by Boris Johnson.

And what is the Irish Government’s contribution to the current state of Anglo-Irish relations?

As Ray Bassett has pointed out, Taoiseach Leo Varadkar’s intransigence on the issue of a time-limit to the North-South ”backstop” in the hope that this could be used to scupper Brexit altogether, has helped to get rid of “Remainer” Prime Minister Theresa May and hand the leadership of the Tory Party to one of the Brexiteers., while damaging underlying Anglo-Irish relations for possibly a long time.

Can our own “ruling class” not give better leadership to the country than this?

Yours sincerely,

Anthony Coughlan, Director, The National Platform EU Research and Information Centre

FIGHT!

Rollingnews

Meanwhile

Luse writes:

This year’s Reith Lectures are by Jonathan Sumption. In the 4th and final lecture on constitution and whether or not the UK would be better off with a written constitution (He argues it wouldn’t, Welsh, Scottish and Northern Irish devolution would have been harder to implement.) he ends as with all the lectures with a question and answer section with the audience, resulting in the following piece of beauty. Page 9 at this link, in which Mark Reckless, yes the one and the same is put back in his box.Considering the scaremongering nonsense that was written to Fintan O’Toole, (above) I thought it might be an additional addendum…

Boris Johnson

This morning,

During his speech, Mr [Boris] Johnson {former British Foreign Secretary] said the answer was to “get back in the cab, turn around and face the real obstacles”.

He said Mrs [Theresa] May’s main concern should be to have the backstop on the island of Ireland removed and to use the transition period to come up with a new trade deal.

He added: “She can go back to Brussels, and she should go back to Brussels and say that the British House of Commons doesn’t accept the democratic consequences of the arrangement you have imposed in the form of the backstop. It’s got to come out.”

Boris Johnson: Abandoning Article 50 would be ‘pathetic’ (Sky)

Yesterday: Perfidious Albion, Duplicitous Hibernia

Rollingnews

This afternoon.

Convention Centre, Dublin

Former British Foreign Secretary and  Churchill biographer Boris Johnson arrives at the second day of the Pendulum Business Leadership Summit.

Sam Boal/Rollingnews

Update:

Oh.

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Mayor of London Boris Johnson in his column in the Telegraph has told people to stop “bashing” the super-rich, comparing them to hard-pressed minorities like the homeless, Irish travellers or ex-gang members.

“The great thing about being Mayor of London is you get to meet all sorts. It is my duty to stick up for every put-upon minority in the city – from the homeless to Irish travellers to ex-gang members to disgraced former MPs. After five years of slog, I have a fair idea where everyone is coming from.

But there is one minority that I still behold with a benign bewilderment, and that is the very, very rich. I mean people who have so much money they can fly by private jet, and who have gin palaces moored in Puerto Banus, and who give their kids McLaren supercars for their 18th birthdays and scour the pages of the FT’s “How to Spend It” magazine for jewel-encrusted Cartier collars for their dogs.

We should be helping all those who can to join the ranks of the super-rich, and we should stop any bashing or moaning or preaching or bitching and simply give thanks for the prodigious sums of money that they are contributing to the tax revenues of this country, and that enable us to look after our sick and our elderly and to build roads, railways and schools.

Indeed, it is possible, as the American economist Art Laffer pointed out, that they might contribute even more if we cut their rates of tax; but it is time we recognised the heroic contribution they already make. In fact, we should stop publishing rich lists in favour of an annual list of the top 100 Tax Heroes, with automatic knighthoods for the top 10.”

We should be humbly thanking the super-rich, not bashing them (Boris Johnson, Telegraph.co.uk)