Tag Archives: Border

Border between Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland

Dara Doyle, of Bloomberg, reports:

Ireland is set to acknowledge publicly for the first time the need to set up checks at or around its border with Northern Ireland in a no-deal Brexit scenario, people familiar with the matter said.

The government will accept that checks, especially on livestock, will be required at least close to the frontier if the U.K. crashes out of the European Union when it publishes no-deal contingency plans on Tuesday, the people said, asking not to be identified because the plans haven’t yet been discussed with cabinet.

…The European Commission has pushed the Irish government to lay out its plans for the border in a no-deal Brexit, a person familiar with the matter said earlier this year. Ireland was proving elusive when the Commission has attempted to pin down the government on its plan, according to the person.

Irish to Accept Need for Border Checks in a No-Deal Brexit (Bloomberg)

Pic: Bloomberg

UPDATE:

UPDATE:

In respect of its article, Bloomberg has added:

The location of any checks is still to be determined, one of the people said.

“An earlier version of this story said the government would accept that checks would have to be at or close to the border.

“A spokesman for Foreign Affairs Minister Simon Coveney said that was “incorrect.” Updated contingency plans will be published in full later Tuesday, after the cabinet has had its discussion, the spokesman said.”

Irish Said to Accept Need for Checks in No-Deal Brexit (Bloomberg)

The Irish Border visualised street by street via Google Streetview

How the border looks on Google Streetview.

A fascinating ribbon of rural back roads offering hope, sanctuary and unlicensed diesel.

Keith writes:

A while back you posted an animation we made which visualised the Irish Border from above, well here’s something else I put together which tries to visualise the border on the ground using StreetView at the crossing points.

View the border here

Previously: Land Of Constant Sorrow

Financial Times writes:

‘Jacob Rees-Mogg you’re right. You don’t need to visit the border… you need to have lived here.’ Belfast-born actor Stephen Rea explores the real impact of Brexit and the uncertainty of the future of the Irish border in a short film written by Clare Dwyer Hogg.

Clare Dwyer Hogg?

May says Brexit talks at stand off, demands new proposals from EU (RTE)

The work of anonymous French artist and photographer JR at the US-Mexican border in South California.

A huge image of Kikito (top pic), a one year-old boy from the city of Tecate which was removed this week, only to be replaced (probably not for long) with a second work in the form of a picnic table (pic 2) extending either  side of the fence where a simultaneous meal was shared by citizens of Mexico and the US.

thisisnthappiness

Screen Shot 2017-02-01 at 15.39.48Screen Shot 2017-02-01 at 15.40.19

Earlier today.

At the Northern Ireland Affairs Committee.

Northern Down Independent MP Lady Sylvia Hermon (top) asks Michael Lux (above), an EU customs and international trade lawyer, about Northern Ireland’s future land border with the Republic of Ireland post Brexit.

During her questioning, Ms Hermon recalled the UK prime minister Theresa May’s visit to Dublin on Monday and her stating that both the UK and Irish governments want a “seamless, frictionless border” between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.

She also asked Mr Lux if he had ever visited the south Armagh border between Northern Ireland and the Republic. He hadn’t.

Further to this…

Syliva Hermon: “I just understood, from your earlier evidence that you, in fact, referred to ‘officials at the Border, officials at the Border’. The difficulty is: we don’t have officials at the Border. And according to the prime minister [Theresa May], we are not going back to the borders of the past.”

Michael Lux: “Yes, but Ireland has to do so. What you do on your side, okay, that’s up to you. If you feel that you don’t need to control the goods which are entering Northern Ireland and have to recover VAT and customs duties and excise duties, you are, of course, free not to do that. But Ireland is obliged to do this.”

Hermon: “So, how could, how could the prime minister achieve a seamless, frictionless border? Is it achievable?”

Lux: “Well, it depends how you define the term seamless. If you define the term ‘seamless’, that there are no border controls, the answer is no. At least for the side of Ireland because Ireland is obliged to apply the [European] Union law.”

Hermon: “I think what I’m also asking is the fact are, will the UK be required to have checkpoints and checks on goods, commercial goods, people?”

Later

Lux:If Northern Ireland remains in the customs union, then all these issues don’t arise. If Northern Ireland is no longer part of the EU customs union, then this is an official customs border of the EU and then Ireland is obliged to apply all these rules.”

Gulp.

Watch back in full here

Thanks Brian Sammon