Tag Archives: Cycling

Last night.

Dublin City Council voted against the Sandymount cycle path trial [along Sandymount strand, Dublin 4] Due to residents’ concerns about displacement of traffic into Sandymount village.

Ragamuffin writes:

The decision is now postponed until January, but looking less likely it will ever happen.

As a resident of Sandymount I was very much in favour of the plan.

Strand Road is a popular route for cyclists, yet is quite dangerous due to a lack of provision for them.

There is a major problem on Strand Rd with on-street parking on the inbound side between the martello tower (St Johns Rd) and Newgrove Ave (Roslyn Park College).

The road is simply not wide enough for 2 lanes of traffic and parking, which results in cars parking up on the kerb. These cars create a blockage for pedestrians on the path (particularly wheelchair users and those pushing buggies), and also pushes cyclists further out into the busy road.

I would argue that if Dublin City Council are going to postpone their segregated cycle lane, then a good interim measure would be removing the hazard of these parked cars by installing double yellow along the length of Strand Road in both directions.

This will free up approximately 1 meter from the road and 1 meter from the path for use by cyclists and pedestrians.

In DCC’s consultation document they describe this parking as ‘informal’, which suggests they take no responsibility for it. There seems to be no signage or ticketing in operation, even though I would have assumed there’s a bylaw against parking on the path in this manner.

If residents on Strand Rd are so desperate to park immediately outside their houses, then they should consider converting their front gardens to parking spaces.

A car is a private piece of property, why should anyone have the right to leave it (for free, in this case) on public land, obstructing a public road and path?

DCC make the valid point that the solution put forward by residents to build boardwalks over the beach and separate cycle lanes, would take years of planning and costly infrastructure as it’s a marine protection area.

DCC’s plan creatively solved these issues by re-purposing our existing resources, but unfortunately it is now put on a back-burner.

Everyone is in agreement that cycling infrastructure in this area, which is very popular with cyclists, needs improvement.

So why not make this small change, which will not completely fix the problem, but would hopefully reduce the risk for cyclists and pedestrians?

The consultation documents (now over) can be found here for anyone interested.

Anyone?

Pics: Google

Nope.

E-Whizz

Meanwhile…

Yesterday.

Dun Laoghaire, County Dublin.

Finally.

Thanks Bebe

Meanwhile…

Um.

This morning.

Further to news yesterday that a LIffey Cycle Route will be trialed this Summer.

Cian Ginty, editor of IrishCycle.com, says there are number of problems with the announcement. Namely:

It is non-continuous.

Mixes cyclists with buses and taxis in sections of bus lanes

.People cycling are exposed to left turning cars and trucks at junctions.

It uses narrow and very narrow lanes where demand is already high

Cian writes:

‘People cycling in Dublin already have cycle lanes which end at bus stops and junctions — what the council is calling “interim measures” will continue this and likely make things more dangerous at junctions

Under the council’s ‘interim measures’ for the quays, people cycling will still have to mix with buses at bus stops, mix with buses and taxis in sections of bus lanes, and, at junctions, there will still be conflict with left turning traffic.

Many people are quick to say ‘something is better than nothing’ but that’s not always the case with cycle route design.

There was a similar situation in London a number of years ago, unsafe stop-start segregated cycle paths were installed without dealing with the conflict areas like junctions and bus stops.

The result was that cycle routes looked more attractive, but the conflict remained or worsened and people died. It is senseless for Dublin to be making the same mistakes — there’s too much at stake.

Councillors need to have vision and implement a trial which is continuously segregated along the quays even if this means disrupting cars on the north quays.

Compromising on cycling safety just to maintain the same number of cars on the quays is pointless — cars are already seriously hampering the operation of the bus network and Luas green line, and there’s more buses and more trams on the way.

Something has to give.

Cities all around the world of different sizes — some with fewer public transport options than Dublin — have shown that city centre become better places when you reduce the number of cars. The sky doesn’t fall in.

The opposite is true and cities become more attractive places to live, work and do business in. For the people who need to drive, there would still be ample routes to reach car parks and other locations.’

7 Reasons Not To Support Dublin City’s New Proposals For The Quays (Cian Ginty, irishcycle.com)

Yesterday: Safe Passage

Last night.

Free the lanes!

Meanwhile…

FIGHT!

Update:

In fairness.

This evening.

Aidan Regan tweetz:

Just cycled the entire length of the quays, from the IFSC to Heuston station.

What an absolute nightmare.

I have seen better cycle infrastructure in the poorest of the poorest part of the city centre in Eastern Europe.

It’s a miracle someone has not been killed biking here.

Earlier: Don’t Stop Pedalling

This morning.

Dublin (exact location unspecified).

Taxi driver TaxiMatt writes:

Now if only there was somewhere safe for this cyclist to cycle and no I’m not tarring you all with the same brush…

Update:

FIGHT!

Thanks Oisín O’Connor

This morning.

At a meeting of the Joint Committee on Transport, Tourism and Sport.

Representatives from Cyclist.ie, Dublin Cycling Campaign and I BIKE Dublin will be going before the committee to discuss road traffic regulations and a national cycling policy.

Later representatives from the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport, and the National Transport Authority will appear before the committee.

The meeting was scheduled to get under way at 9.30am and is currently in private session.

Watch live here or from the link above.

Previously: I BIKE Dublin on Broadsheet