Tag Archives: bikes

Yesterday.

Dun Laoghaire, County Dublin.

Finally.

Thanks Bebe

Meanwhile…

Um.

This morning.

Along the North Quay, Dublin.

Meanwhile.

In Dublin, Jimmy Stagg of Stagg Cycles in Lucan, has seen it all; from the Kelly-Roche boom to the recession and the cycling boom during that period. But he says the current surge in business is more hectic than anything he has ever witnessed.

Asked what it had been like, he said: “Absolutely unbelievable. I’m 45 years in the business and never, ever would I have dreamed anything ike this could happen in our industry.”

Ireland’s new cycling boom: “It’s like nothing I’ve seen in 40 years in business” (Sticky Bottle)

Rollingnews

Roche?

Kelly?

Meanwhile

Last night.

Seapoint, County Dublin.

Yesterday.

Kirwan Street, Dublin 7.

Gavin Ward tweetz:

Got to see a Bike Bunker during my walk today, love the idea of these! Great to see this Dublin City Council Beta [an initiative to ‘trial and establish solutions to improve the liveability of the Capital’] project move to  Dublin City Council, hopefully they roll out quicker now…

Bike Bunkers

The tool machine toting ‘tea leaf’ is seen wearing a distinctive bobble hat and what appear to be spectacles.

Stop that.

This afternoon.

Sir John Rogerson’s Quay, Dublin Docklands, Dublin 2.

Meanwhile

Do you know him?

Tell him he’s a real jerk.

Thanks Nat King Coleslaw

This morning.

Further to news yesterday that a LIffey Cycle Route will be trialed this Summer.

Cian Ginty, editor of IrishCycle.com, says there are number of problems with the announcement. Namely:

It is non-continuous.

Mixes cyclists with buses and taxis in sections of bus lanes

.People cycling are exposed to left turning cars and trucks at junctions.

It uses narrow and very narrow lanes where demand is already high

Cian writes:

‘People cycling in Dublin already have cycle lanes which end at bus stops and junctions — what the council is calling “interim measures” will continue this and likely make things more dangerous at junctions

Under the council’s ‘interim measures’ for the quays, people cycling will still have to mix with buses at bus stops, mix with buses and taxis in sections of bus lanes, and, at junctions, there will still be conflict with left turning traffic.

Many people are quick to say ‘something is better than nothing’ but that’s not always the case with cycle route design.

There was a similar situation in London a number of years ago, unsafe stop-start segregated cycle paths were installed without dealing with the conflict areas like junctions and bus stops.

The result was that cycle routes looked more attractive, but the conflict remained or worsened and people died. It is senseless for Dublin to be making the same mistakes — there’s too much at stake.

Councillors need to have vision and implement a trial which is continuously segregated along the quays even if this means disrupting cars on the north quays.

Compromising on cycling safety just to maintain the same number of cars on the quays is pointless — cars are already seriously hampering the operation of the bus network and Luas green line, and there’s more buses and more trams on the way.

Something has to give.

Cities all around the world of different sizes — some with fewer public transport options than Dublin — have shown that city centre become better places when you reduce the number of cars. The sky doesn’t fall in.

The opposite is true and cities become more attractive places to live, work and do business in. For the people who need to drive, there would still be ample routes to reach car parks and other locations.’

7 Reasons Not To Support Dublin City’s New Proposals For The Quays (Cian Ginty, irishcycle.com)

Yesterday: Safe Passage

A cycle route along the River Liffey will be trialed in August

This afternoon.

Ciarán Ferrie, Of I BIKE Dublin, writes:

I BIKE Dublin welcomes the proposal by Dublin City Council to put in place a trial of the Liffey Cycle Route by August of this year.

This response to a petition raised late last year by Cian Ginty of IrishCycle.com is a strong statement of intent by the council that they are listening to the concerns of people who cycle in the city.

The proposed trial cycle route, while far from ideal, will improve the safety of people already cycling on the quays and will hopefully encourage more people to cycle.

It will also improve the experience of people walking on the quays with additional pedestrian crossings put in place which will become permanent fixtures.

Louise Williams, Vice Chair of Dublin Cycling Campaign, says:

“The Liffey Quays is currently a hazardous environment for people on bikes, and this results in fewer people choosing to cycle there.

We want to see a city where people of all ages and abilities are enabled to cycle, and this trial of the Liffey Cycle Route is a big step in that direction.”

I BIKE Dublin

Dublin Cycling Campaign

Previously: Liffey Cycle

UPDATE:

Dublin City Council’s Liffey Cycle Route.

Read about the plans in full here

Dublin’s long-awaited Liffey cycle route to be in place by August (Olivia Kelly, The Irish Times)

This afternoon.

Stillorgan, County Dublin

Minister for Transport Tourism and Sport Shane Ross TD, CEO of the Road Safety Authority Moya Murdock, Cathaoirleach of Dún Laoghaire- Rathdown County Council Ossian Smyth and Chief Superintendent of an Garda Siochana Paul Cleary pictured beside new signage advising motorists of the 1.0m gap they must allow between overtaking cyclists, on the Intersection between Lower Kilmacud Road and Mount Anville Wood, Stillorgan, County Dublin.

Sam Boal/Rollingnews

Earlier….

Transport Minister Shane Ross (top) has introduced new dangerous overtaking laws which took effect at Midnight

From midnight.

The dangerous overtaking of cyclists will now incur a fixed charge fine of up to €120 and a minimum of three penalty points.

The new regulations state “a driver shall not overtake or attempt to overtake if to do so would endanger or cause inconvenience to a pedal cyclist.”

I BIKE Dublin Spokesperson Vanessa Sterry said:

“Our die-in in front of the office of the Garda Traffic Department last Friday was to highlight that current enforcement of existing legislation is completely insufficient to keep people who cycle safe from the minority of drivers who behave dangerously on the roads.

“I BIKE Dublin continues to call for the Gardaí to be equipped and staffed properly and to use evidence-based policing as has been proven to work in other jurisdictions. The West Midlands Police in the UK have pioneered online video portals to enable quick prosecution. New legislation to protect people who cycle is meaningless, without an announcement by Ministers Flanagan and Ross that the Gardaí will use international best practice.”

New cycling laws step in right direction – Dublin Cycling Campaign (RTÉ)

I Bike Dublin

Rollingnews

Friday: Die-In Another Day