Tag Archives: Google

This morning/afternoon

YouTube has removed UK’s talkRADIO’s channel from its platform apparently on the grounds of breaching Covid-19 content guidelines.

The London-based station broadcasts a live stream from its studio on its YouTube channel and regularly feature guests who have questioned the official covid narrative.

A spokesperson for talkRADIO said:

“We urgently await a detailed response from Google/YouTube about the nature of the breach that has led to our channel being removed from its platform.

“talkRADIO is an Ofcom licensed and regulated broadcaster and has robust editorial controls in place, taking care to balance debate. We regularly interrogate government data and we have controls in place, use verifiable sources and give space to a careful selection of voices and opinions.”

Meanwhile…

The tech giant has yet to respond to Press Gazette’s request for an explanation about why the channel has been deleted and what the process was which led to this action.

Google deletes Talkradio Youtube channel for unspecified violation of ‘community guidelines’ (UK Press Gazette)

This afternoon.

The US Senate.

In a contentious hearing, the CEOs of Google, Facebook, and Twitter, from top: Sundar Pichai, Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey were questioned by Senators over their content moderation policies.

Via CNN:

[Republican Senator] Ted Cruz angrily went after Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, pressing him on the platform’s decision to restrict content posted by the New York Post. He concluded by shouting at Dorsey: “Mr. Dorsey, who the hell elected you and put you in charge of what the media are allowed to report and what the American people are allowed to hear, and why do you persist in behaving as a Democratic super PAC silencing views to the contrary of your political beliefs?”

And take off the damn nose ring.

It’s not Coachella, you shadow-banning spanner.

CEOs of Google, Twitter and Facebook grilled in Senate hearing (CNN)

This afternoon.

Cardiff Lane, Grand Canal Dock, Dublin 2.

The Sorting Office building in ‘Silicon Docks’ was due to be rented by Google to house 2,000 employees. The tech giant confirmed last night that plans for the lease have been cancelled.

Everyone stay cool.

Soft landing, remember?

Google’s withdrawal from Dublin office deal cast doubts on sector (Irish Times)

Leah Farrell/Rollingnews

Yesterday’s The Guardian

However…

This afternoon.

Via The Irish Examiner:

Ireland’s Covid Tracker smartphone application is sharing information which could lead to location tracking with Google at least every 20 minutes, the Irish Examiner can reveal.

A new research paper released by the school of computer science and statistics at Trinity College Dublin details the information that is shared – which includes IP address, the handset’s IMEI (its unique identifier which can be used to block its usage), serial number, phone number, and email address – and describes the revelation as being “extremely troubling from a privacy viewpoint”.

The HSE had insisted that the app is completely anonymous and does not track location data.

However, the HSE only controls the public health side of the app, with the exposure notification segment being administered by both Google and Apple via their Google/Apple Exposure Notification (GAEN) service.

Meanwhile…

“The HSE has been celebrated in Ireland and beyond for their transparent approach to developing the Covid Tracker app,” said Elizabeth Farries, director of information rights with The Irish Council for Civil Liberties (ICCL.)

However, Google Play Services represent a significant component of the app. Most people, even app developers, are unaware of this level of invasiveness,” she added.

Also.

It has also emerged that the HSE’s side of the app is collating information via the metrics it receives from users which could be used to link all requests sent from the same phone together, akin to a ‘cookie’ footprint left by a computer as it surfs the internet.

Anyone?

Covid-19 tracking app sharing possible location data with Google (Cianan Brennan, Irish Examiner)

Yesterday: Cheap, popular and it works: Ireland’s contact-tracing app success (The Guardian)

Previously: Hapless App

Rollingnews

From top: Apple CEO Tim Cook greets Taoiseach Leo Varadkar at an IDA Ireland event in the National Concert Hall last month to mark Apple’s 40 years of investment; Aidan Regan

On RTÉ’ Radio One’s Morning Ireland.

Dr Gavin Jennings asked rhetorically why most people who voted in the general election, and who responded to RTÉ’s exit poll, said “they didn’t believe they benefitted from the country’s economic recovery”.

He told listeners:

“Ireland’s economy is growing richer, faster than most European countries and there are more people working than ever before.”

Dr Jennings then interviewed Associate Professor at University College Dublin’s School of Politics and International Relations Aidan Regan, who writes a column in the Business Post.

Dr Gavin Jennings: “You were writing in the Sunday Business Post, as far back as 2017 that the economic boom was setting up a political timebomb that could stoke a Brexit-style backlash. What did you mean and do you think you were right?”

Aidan Regan: “I mean, broadly speaking, yes. Perhaps not as quick as has appeared to have happened. But what’s meant by that, and of course, I don’t pick the headlines for these things…what’s meant by that is that Ireland is very dependent on one or two key sectors and in particular, and increasingly so, on the ICTC sector, let’s say big tech, right, for your listeners.”

“And that foreign direct investment and big capital for technology companies has been beneficial right? It has ultimately lifted the economy out of the recession. It has generated computer service exports and in that sense has enabled the Government in the austerity years to implement an internal adjustment without effectively crashing the entire economy.

“But, in terms of the kind of job and income growth and productivity gains that comes with that, it’s very narrowly concentrated in a very small section of the workforce.

“And those work in these high-tech, high-income sectors, or more concretely, in these firms, like think about Dublin City here where we are, Google is the biggest…”

Jennings: “Apple, Cork, yeah.”

Regan: “….biggest private employer in the city. You know, if you’re working those companies, of course you don’t feel, you don’t, there never has been a recession. There has been no austerity. But you do obviously feel the effects of under investment in public service infrastructure.

“So the point of that article and the point of that research suggested was ‘look this is not sustainable’. When you have an economy that’s so dependent on one or two key sectors, and the net gains of that increasingly are concentrated, in addition to the fact that there’s a lot of funny money floating around.

“The headline figures look a lot better than they are. It does not provide the fertile ground for political and electoral sustainability.”

Jennings: “There has been a rise in wages nationally. But it’s an uneven rise in wages.”

Regan: “Yes, I mean. So overall in the economy, and particularly in the past couple of years, overall earnings have gone up. People’s wages have improved but some people’s wages have improved by double digit figures on a year-on-year basis for a couple of years.

“When you have that type of wage growth, it obviously creates, that’s to say, puts upward pressure on the price of non-tradeables as you would say, basically housing, rent, restaurants, etc. And so therefore, if you’re earning those higher incomes, in those particular sectors, you’re in a position to, well, afford to pay the cost of living within the city that you would live in.

“But not everybody earns those types of wages.

“So whilst there has been a growth overall in our earnings and wages, it has not been equal. And, effectively, if you look at the income distribution, break it down by earnings. It doesn’t look as healthy as is often assumed.

“I mean the median wage in this country is about €36,000. Gross income, it’s stripped out. If you include earnings and non-earnings, 85 per cent of people in this country have less than €50,000. That’s not a huge amount of money to be able to afford those things in this country which are expensive, housing, health, education.”

Later

Regan: “It’s estimated that 70 per cent of people who work in Google are non-Irish which would suggest that they don’t have a vote in the national elections. The public policy regime in Ireland is increasingly tailored to, you know, the high-tech, higher income earners and that’s understandable which would make sense in most countries, given that those same people would have a vote and they would typically support, in this case, the centre, centre-right parties.

“And that’s what you would expect. But in this country, that’s not the case because these people don’t have a vote. So it’s a very volatile growth regime. It’s a very volatile growth model that’s dependent upon not just inward investment from US multi-nationals but also the free movement of workers from the European Union.”

Listen back in full here

Google offices on Barrow Street, Dublin 4

Ronald Quinlan, in The Irish Times, reports:

Google has entered into talks in relation to the rental of all 202,000sq ft (18,766sq m ) of space at the Sorting Office, the seven-storey office block being developed in the Dublin docklands by Pat Crean’s Marlet Property Group.

Should a deal be agreed, the accommodation at the Sorting Office would provide Google with enough room to grow its existing 8,000-strong Dublin-based workforce by up to 2,000 employees. A spokesperson for Google declined to comment.

The news of Google’s negotiations with the Sorting Office’s Singapore-headquartered owner, Mapletree Investments, comes just three weeks on from The Irish Times reporting of the US tech giant’s agreement to lease more than 75,000sq ft (7,000sq m) of office space in Block I at Green Reit’s Central Park scheme in Sandyford, Dublin 18.

Google in talks for new Dublin docklands offices (Ronald Quinlan, The Irish Times)

 

From top: Google Maps image of Tallaght wetlands; Apple Maps image of Tallaght wetlands.

Um.

Liam writes:

Someone (South Dublin County Council?) has requested Google to blur the aerial image of part of the wetlands affected by the recent controversy.

When was this requested and by whom and why was it granted, was it before or after the event? The second picture is from Apple maps and shows what the image should look like.

Anyone?

Yesterday: ‘Like The Surface Of The Moon’

Peter O’Connor writes:

Following on from the “The Algorithm Method” post in June, it would be really good if you shared the follow-up video

While many readers are with Google’s political lean, people aught to take a longer term view and consider the flimsy and subjective nature of a term like “authoritative content”….and hopefully look past the politics of someone like Gemma O’Doherty who is trying to take Google to task and is vocal on these matters in her protests (top at their Dublin HQ).

Google “Machine Learning Fairness” Whistleblower Goes Public, says: “burden lifted off of my soul” (Project Veritas)

Previously: The Algorithim Method

Rollingnews