Tag Archives: traffic

One of the new 55m Luas trams on O’Connell Bridge, Dublin last week

Justin McCarthy, of RTE, reports:

The Dáil has been told that passengers taking the new Luas Cross City line at rush hour would be “quicker walking” because of congestion in Dublin city centre.

The claim was made by Fianna Fáil’s transport spokesman Robert Troy.

He said he took the Cross City line from Dawson Street to O’Connell Street this morning “in order to experience for myself the length of time”.

“It took 20 minutes, I would have been quicker walking,” he said.

“Coming back I took a taxi in order to be here for Question Time. [It took] 25 minutes.

Passengers are ‘quicker walking’ than taking new Luas line, Dáil hears (RTE)

Previously: Bridge of Sighs

One Job

Ormond Quay, Dublin 1 yesterday

Further to the reduction of car lanes along Dublin’s quays to one and cars no longer being able to turn right onto O’Connell Bridge from Bachelors Walk…

This frustration of those who commute by car is misdirected at Dublin City Council, when it is their fellow motorists who are better placed to alleviate the problem.

Dublin City Council will inevitably attempt to promote methods of transport which are more efficient in bringing people to the highly congested city centre.

Private cars are the least efficient method possible in terms of road space, parking space, energy consumption and pollution. While there will always be a need for private cars for certain individuals, their present use among city centre commuters is excessive.

If the only people insisting on using private cars to commute were those who genuinely could not use other means, be it due to infirmity, distance or a lack of a reasonable public transport alternative, the congestion in the city centre would be a much smaller problem.

The reality is that commuters in areas of Dublin such as my own, which are well served by public transport and within cycling distance of the city centre, continue to drive past the bus stop 10 metres from their front door on their way to work.

Restrictions are only necessary because certain commuters need greater incentives to change their behaviour.

Once they do, the commute will be easier for everyone, including those who need to drive.

Christopher McMahon,
Castleknock,
Dublin 15.

FIGHT!

Traffic and Dublin’s quays (Irish Times letters page)

Leah Farrell/Rollingnews